Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,565   Posts: 1,545,347   Online: 1005
      
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 32

Thread: Glass

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Central Texas
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    67
    Why do we put photographs behind glass when we put them on display? Do we really need to do this? I get tired of walking into a gallery or museum and see nothing but reflections and a hint of something on paper. Do ya'll think that we really need glass in front of the photo or is this just a strange habit that we (or the industry) have gotten into.
    huh?

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    4,530
    Like you I would rather see the image without interference, but just imagine, you have spent many hours and lots of mula making your gelatin/pt/cyanotype....(fill in what rocks you). YOur work gets to the gallerie/museum/show....and you see all these people touching, licking, putting their greasy nose on the print.... I think this is the reason for the use of glass, not really and aesthetic reason but more of an insurance dont mess with the work issue.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    France
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    357
    David,

    first of all, glass is a good protection. A print without glass will be more exposed to dust (and thus your wife's duster), smoke, air pollution, etc. If you do not want to view your prints behind glass, I would suggest using a portfolio box instead

  4. #4
    jmcd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    715
    Images
    41
    Glass is a great protector for prints hung on the wall, but does not show the prints at their best, I think. I use it, but consider it a compromise. I like to see the surface of the print, but glass gets in the way. Of course, some glass is better than others. I would like to hear people's experience with different glass types.

    I worked with a photographer who had a great method of display. In addition to prints behind glass up on the wall, he had a leather bound book with handmade pages. Each page had a tipped in photograph. When he handed the book to a viewer, he asked them to wear a pair of white gloves, which kept off fingerprints, and also conveyed that he was letting them see something he cared about preserving. Viewing prints this way made for an intimate experience.

    I have heard that Wynn Bullock and guests sat in a darkened room, before an easel holding one mounted print at a time, which was illuminated by spotlight.

    Just two ideas.

  5. #5
    Sean's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    New Zealand
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,560
    Blog Entries
    7
    Images
    15
    I've heard that some acrylics are more clear than glass. has anyone tried this? A lot of high end aquariums use acrylic because it give the appearance that there is nothing between you and the water. I wonder how it would work for displaying photo prints. Probably to prone to glare.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Just north of the Inferno
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    750
    Images
    27
    Acrylic is better than glass in two main areas -

    1) Weight. Acrylic is VERY light. This is the main reason they use it in aquariums now. Especially the BIG ones.

    2) Visibility. Acrylic is clearer than glass when you get to certain thicknesses and when you compare costs, clear acrylic is cheaper than specialty glass designed for clarity.

    The problem is it scratches like CRAZY, and when it comes to using it for framing, glass is the winner because there the glass is so thin that you don't get any distortion. Weight isn't an issue either.

    Official Photo.net Villain
    ----------------------
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]DaVinci never wrote an artist's statement...[/FONT]

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Nuernberg, Germany
    Posts
    214
    These days there are several types of "museum" glass available that cut way down on reflection but are still clear, in fact, I think one of the manufacturers is called Everclear.

    The results are impressive and the price tag is equally impressive. Me? I stick with regular glass, atleast until I can afford something better...
    - William Levitt

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Central Texas
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    67
    Okay, so the only reason that we use glass is for protection, Right? So why don't museums put glass in front of those old, one-of-a-kind, priceless paintings? Why don't art galleries put glass in front of those expensive, original oil (or water color, pastel, etc.) paintings. Why is it that the photographic community is the only part of the Art World that regularly puts glass in front of our work? Are photographs that much more delicate than a painting in pastel or watercolor?
    huh?

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    4,530
    Are photographs that much more delicate than a painting in pastel or watercolor?

    Yes, the sistine chapel has lasted for hundreds of years, watercolors are exhibited under glass.The paintings you mention as you state are not under glass, but look around and see how many guards are there to make sure you dont touch it. I have no idea the effect fingerprint oils have on a hardened oil paint, but I know the do have a very harmful effect on prints.
    We have had paintings that are perfect after being flooded, stained with water, etc, etc. try that with a print! In a word...yes they are more fragile than the objects of art you mention.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    38
    A few years ago, my wife and I moved across the country from Arizona to Texas. We packed everything very carefully, and the move was done by professional movers. When we un-packed our photographs, we were devistated to find several one- of -a- kind prints, that were framed and matted under glass, smashed. The broken glass had cut into the surface of the prints. They were ruined beyond repair. Since that time , I have framed all of my prints with acrylic (Plexiglass), instead of glass. This plastic material is also available with built-in UV protection, at a slight additional cost. It was an expensive lesson for me to learn.

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin