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  1. #11

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    Apr 2003
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    I've seen lots of exhibitions recently, and the only photographer who has signed their work is Mario Giacomelli. He did it in biro wherever there was an inch or two of whitespace. But on the other hand, he spotted his photographs with biros!

  2. #12

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    Apr 2003
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    reimerron, The art judges do have a point. Any print will hold more value if the print itself is signed rather than the matt or overmat. In addition - some collecters also like to see the print dated and feel that also can have an effect on the prints ultimate value. There are archival inks as well as pens for that matter that can be used for signing the front and as has been mentioned, pencil is the standard if signing on the back (on verso). Check out any photo auction site and see how the value of even well know work changes depending upon if the print itself is signed or not. This does not mean that you can not still sign the overmat as was suggested. I should also mention that "bleeding" a print to the edge of the paper is generaly not an excepted gallery standard. Its best toleave 1/2 to 1 inch white boarder around your image area.

  3. #13
    Ole
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    A wedding photographer I know signs his colour prints in a rather special way:
    Moisten a dark(ish) corner, sign with a dried-out ballpoint pen (thin Biro's are good). When the print is dry, it is indelibly signed in a warm golden tone...
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  4. #14

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    Well I ordered a japanese hanko to sign my prints and it looks great, not to mention unusual. They are expensive but they come directly from japan and the little things are a work of art themselves. If you are curious check them out at:

    http://www.thejapaneseconnection.com


  5. #15
    lee
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    that is pretty cool. I have seen them before but not for signing photos.

    lee\c

  6. #16

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    Dec 2002
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    Jorge, Those are cool. What a neat idea.
    Art is a step from what is obvious and well-known toward what is arcane and concealed.

    Visit my website at http://www.donaldmillerphotography.com

  7. #17

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    Yeah, unlike the chinese chops, these are small. Mine is only one centimeter square, it fits perfectly just under the print and above the mat. Another good thing is that the inks they send you are archival, so your prints wont be harmed. The guy, Ben Falge is really courteous and has great communication with you to help you choose what would be good for you. ALthough the little gizmo is expensive I gotta say the purchasing experience was a pleasure, nice guy, helpful and professional. You can also ask him to add additional stuff to your stamp to make it unique.

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