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  1. #11

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    >Most have custom makers of golf clubs and they use a chop saw to cut the shafts. talk to them.

    You really need a special saw setup to cut frames or else the corners will look like a high school kid's science fair project. That's probably not the look you are going for. Other places might be able to cut metal, but they wouldn't have the correct setup to cut metal frames. I can assure you of this. My father has a frame shop in his basement and I frame all my own work.

    try "presto" www.framingsupplies.com or 1800-334-9060. there are tons of other places out there.

    jon

  2. #12
    Aggie's Avatar
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  3. #13
    ann
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    Have checked around town, but need a business license to avoid retail prices, which i will not do.
    Have all the hardware needed as we only use metal frames in class. Thanks to the information given in several other post, I will be calling other companies. Strolling down "goggle lane" is time consuming and it would appear not as forth coming with as much informaton as I needed. I either missed the above companies or they were not on the list. Oh, well. Thanks to the help of others on this board I will be able to take care of this with out spending a 1000 for framing.
    Besides, these are for a show, and then what does one person do with all those empty frames!!!
    http://www.aclancyphotography.com

  4. #14

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    Aggie,

    That might work fine for you. I'm sure you can build beautiful frames and it sounds like your a well qualified metal worker. But I'm not sure that would apply to your average photographer looking to frame a show. Why send somebody to a "golf shop" to do a custom job in a production facilty with saws intended to make golf clubs, when simply calling a frame shop to do a routine job - with the correct tools - is so much easier and cheaper? Again, present company excluded.

    My advice to those listening in..... Go to a retail outlet or frame shop to buy frames. Unless, you are a metal worker or have a frame shop in your basement, in which case I would go that route.

    jon

  5. #15
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  6. #16

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    So where is the golf shop going to get the stock frame material to cut? They probably order that kind of thing all the time, right? My guess, they're going to go to a frame shop (ie. retail, wholesale, or mail order supplier). Why not eliminate a middle man. You can find high quality, perfectly cut, frame material in the exact (or close) colors by simply shopping around. And it is prety affordable - relative to retail Neilsen frames.

    happy golfing :-)
    jon

  7. #17
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  8. #18
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    </span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (Aggie @ Apr 7 2003, 09:28 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>&nbsp; As for the person making the golf clubs? well they have to maintain a tolerance of +/- .001 of a mm in making those cuts. </td></tr></table><span class='postcolor'>
    Oh ... so I&#39;m a nitpicker. I can&#39;t shake the years in the metrology labs.

    Uh .... .001 of a mm (one-thousandth of a millimeter) is one micrometer (not to be confused with the measuring instrument - SI decreed it would be named "micrometer" ) or 1 um, or 1,000 nanometers, or ten A(with circle over)ngstroms.

    That is equal to .000 039 37 inches - roughly 40 millionths - not a great deal, considering that the average hair is about 1500 millionths of an inch thick.

    Golfers may be picky - but I don&#39;t think they are THAT picky.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

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