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  1. #11

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    Good Evening,

    I've used only Colormount with RC and found it satisfactory. Regarding temperature: Seal used to make test strips to indicate the correct press temperature. They are helpful, especially because a press, over time, may not hold consistent temperatures, or the temperature gauge could be a bit off. Absent indicator strips, just take a scrap RC print, or a small portion of one, put it in the press at what you think is the correct temperature and for the correct time. If adherence is poor, tweak the temperature up a bit; if the test scrap shows signs of melting, dial the temperature back a bit. It's not at all tricky and won't need to be done every time if your press is in good condition. One other tip: RC paper is very susceptible to showing small bumps from any foreign matter between the print and the mount board, so be sure that everything is clean. Use release paper, of course, to keep any adhesive off the platen. (Cleaning a platen is no fun!)

    Konical

  2. #12
    Jim Jones's Avatar
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    I've recently noticed faint discoloration of Light Impressions rag mount board near the edge of floating RC prints dry mounted with Colormount years ago. Now I print on oversize paper that extends under the window mat to prevent this.

  3. #13
    ROL
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBrunner View Post
    Bienfang Buffermount is the only "archival" dry mount tissue I know of. Its what I use, as I prefer dry mount presentation. Per Volquartz uses it as well. (he turned me on to it)

    Even so, other methods offer better "archivability" than any dry mount process.

    If you are set on dry mount, Buffermount is the best bet.
    Best? Perhaps, as long as you can control the environment of the finished print. BufferMount is well known to release on its own at moderately high temperature – that is its strength (and purpose) archivally, and its weakness as a mounting tissue. I have have had prints mounted with BufferMount release in their frames when direct sunlight hits the glazing and heats up the air trapped between it and the print. I have returned to mounting prints larger than 20X24 *permanently* with (roll) MT5, as reattachment with large works is just too problematic. BufferMount cannot be claimed to be "archival" if it fails to secure the print. Large fiber based photographic prints simply will not appear, to most, to be finished properly if hinge–mounted, a technique which, if panned for accordingly, I otherwise endorse. In this case, practical outcomes outweigh theoretical expectations of archival–ness.

    ColorMount is adequate for RC prints. As previously stated, 180ºF, is recommended. 20ºF – 30ºF cooler than fiber, wherever that is on your particular press. Practice with rejected prints. Release papers are totally unnecessary for B/W photographic prints. Simply sandwich the print/tissue/mount package between two clean pieces of mat board. This time–honored technique has the great advantage of dispersing heat from the platten evenly.

    I believe, it's worth a reminder at this point that one only heats the tissue sufficiently to melt the adhesive. Adhesion occurs as the tissue cools, assisted greatly under weight.

    ...for more see Print Presentation
    Last edited by ROL; 01-06-2012 at 11:58 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #14
    ROL
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    Quote Originally Posted by podin04 View Post
    Is there a real difference between dry mount tissues when it comes to dry mounting RC prints? I just bought a packet of Adorama Dry Mount tissue and got curling at the corners and edges and was difficult to tack. Very disappointing. The Colormount is much more expensive. Worth it?

    Is there a type of tissue that is particularly suited for dry mounting?
    This appears to be one case where it is worth sticking with brand names, Seal–Bienfang. Generic knock–offs can be hit and miss. I remember this particularly with the Arista tissues. It may not be so much an issue of quality as the conditions under which tissues are stored, drying them out.

    Tacking iron use seems to be somewhat of an art in itself. It should be heated just enough to allow the tissue to melt underneath as the iron is moved, under the weight of the iron itself. Tissue that refuses to melt should be discarded.
    Last edited by ROL; 01-06-2012 at 12:10 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #15

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    I've never cared for the look of drymounted RC's, especially the glossy variety. The heat makes the
    print conform to the texture of the mouting board ("orangepeel"). So-called archival mount tissues
    with alkaline buffering are largely meaningless. Their low-temp bonding just increases the change of delaminating if storage or display temps get esp warm, and the buffering is totally redundant. Ordinary Colormount is a bit of an acid barrier anyway, and the nature of the substrate itself is
    way more important. A lot of BS out there on this topic. Nobody I know of has lost a potential print
    sale or has had a significant images turned down by a museum because it was drymounted. But
    RC prints aren't all that permanent anyway. I prefer to cold mount color prints, but that requires
    more skill than drymounting.

  6. #16

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    To OP:

    I have some spare mount board and Bienfang ColorMount tissue. I can either send you some if you have your own hot press, or I can try mounting one here, if you tell me what kind of RC paper you are talking about.

    PM me if interested.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  7. #17
    ROL
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    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    I've never cared for the look of drymounted RC's, especially the glossy variety. The heat makes the
    print conform to the texture of the mouting board ("orangepeel").
    True enough with color glossy resin prints. Pebble and matte B&W RC mount up just fine. I have 30+ year old one hanging in my bathroom. Although I don't consider it to be a fine art print, it shows virtually no signs of aging or dry mount disruption, other than almost imperceptible fading of its cheap wood pulp mat.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by ROL View Post
    I have have had prints mounted with BufferMount release in their frames when direct sunlight hits the glazing and heats up the air trapped between it and the print.
    If you're hanging glazed prints in direct sunlight, the mounting tissue releasing is the least of your worries.

    Quote Originally Posted by ROL View Post
    BufferMount cannot be claimed to be "archival" if it fails to secure the print.
    I certainly can't speak to your specific problem, but I've used this product for many years and on literally hundreds of prints. Never once has there been a problem when this product is used correctly. And as far as it being removable, I've had several instances where people have damaged the mounting board and the print has been saved by removing it and remounting. Had I used Colormount, it would not have been possible.

    Edit** I just noticed this thread pertains to dry mounting of RC prints. There is nothing archival about RC prints, so the point is mute.**

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