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  1. #1
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    Dry Mounting RC prints

    I did a search but did not find much mention on dry mounting RC prints. I have some prints that I want to dry mount but I have no experience with dry mounting (I'm trying to be more archivally aware with all my processes). I know that there is dry mount tissue for RC paper, but are there any bits of info that anyone can pass on that will keep me from ruining some very nice RC prints that I have.

    Thans for any info.
    Chuck

  2. #2

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    Hi
    I have had good success with dry mounting RC prints with a press. I found a good time/temp is 30 seconds at 210 deg. with moderate pressure. I haven't burned one yet so I guess this is a good combination. I use Kodak Type 2 tissue.
    Patrick

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    The instructions on the Bienfang ColorMount tissue I use for RC prints recommends the temperature of the press to be set at 190 degrees F. Otherwise, the technique is much like other tissues used on fiber based prints. I've been using bienfang ColorMount and its Seal brand predecessor for about 20 years with complete satisfaction.

  4. #4
    ann
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    we dry mount RC prints all the time in our classes.

    temp. about 200 for about 20 seconds depending on the humdity.

    been doing this for over 15 years with the students and never an issue.
    http://www.aclancyphotography.com

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    fdi
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    Practice with a few prints you dont care about.

  6. #6

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    Chuck1
    I have some prints that I want to dry mount but I have no experience with dry mounting (I'm trying to be more archivally aware with all my processes)...

    I am not sure dry mounting is good for long life of a photograph, even many here state opposite. One more problem I didi not mention befor is how you think to reframe your dry mounted photograps when you cannot remove it, or can do it with good cost and risk, and than dry mount again and set the same question again.

    The best is acid free mat in front, acid free foam at the back (thick around 1/8), mechanical means to fix the photograph, no glass if no fly problem.

    WWW.Leica-R.com

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    fdi
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    Technically, dry mounting is not considered to be an archival conservation method for the very reason that it can not be 100% reversed. The reason for 100% reversal is the mount board and mat board get contaminated with harmful pollutants over time and this allows them to be replaced with fresh components. If you use truly acid free, and buffered mounting board, the dry mounting procedure is properly done, and the image is a few inches from the edge of the mount board, it will take a long time before the photo starts to degrade if properly framed. Bainbridge Artcare foamboard and mat board is even better because it will actively neutralize acidic compounds entering the framing package.

    T-hinging with Japanese rice paper, and wheat starch adhesive is about the only conservative method of mounting artwork. Unfortunately, it will not keep the image flat. A slight curl to an image is considered proper mounting to a museum collector. To the average consumer, it looks like a poor mount job.

    Unless you are limited on space (like many selling in artshows), I recommend 3/16 foamcore as opposed to 1/8. It is just a lot less likely to warp. Less of an issue for 16x20 and smaller.

    I have more info about picture frame mounting techniques here.

    Cheers,
    mark

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck1 View Post
    I did a search but did not find much mention on dry mounting RC prints. I have some prints that I want to dry mount but I have no experience with dry mounting (I'm trying to be more archivally aware with all my processes). I know that there is dry mount tissue for RC paper, but are there any bits of info that anyone can pass on that will keep me from ruining some very nice RC prints that I have.

    Thans for any info.
    Chuck
    RC prints can be overheated causing irreversible damage. It's recommended, when dry mounting these, to determine the optimum laminating temperature. This is done with wax crayons, or pellets, rated at specific temperatures (a go-no-go method) by finding the right wax that matches the target temperature (when the wax melts) for the material being laminated, then mark the press temperature setting. Always use the determined setting for future work with RC prints. You'll need to test for correct temperature only one time.

    The wax strips were called temple sticks, I think, and should still be available, or something equivalent. I do remember these items were rather expensive for what they were - crayons.

    Dry mounting with acid free materials poses no problems. It is reversable if done correctly.
    "Pictures are not incidental frills to a text; they are essences of our distinctive way of knowing." Stephen J. Gould

  9. #9
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    Bienfang Buffermount is the only "archival" dry mount tissue I know of. Its what I use, as I prefer dry mount presentation. Per Volquartz uses it as well. (he turned me on to it)

    Even so, other methods offer better "archivability" than any dry mount process.

    If you are set on dry mount, Buffermount is the best bet.

  10. #10

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    Types of tissue for RC

    Is there a real difference between dry mount tissues when it comes to dry mounting RC prints? I just bought a packet of Adorama Dry Mount tissue and got curling at the corners and edges and was difficult to tack. Very disappointing. The Colormount is much more expensive. Worth it?

    Is there a type of tissue that is particularly suited for dry mounting?

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