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  1. #1
    bmac's Avatar
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    When framing prints for sale, what kind of frames do you use? A friend and I were discussing this today over lunch. Black "museum" frames are kind of in vogue right now, but do you think people would respond differently to wood colored frames? Just currious.
    hi!

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    I think it totally depends on the image. As long as the frame doesn't clash with or overpower the image you are o.k. One big point to plain museum frames is that they don't get in the way.
    Official Photo.net Villain
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  3. #3
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmac
    When framing prints for sale, what kind of frames do you use? A friend and I were discussing this today over lunch. Black "museum" frames are kind of in vogue right now, but do you think people would respond differently to wood colored frames? Just currious.
    Yes, the aesthetic effect *would* be different.

    Framing and matting is nearly an art unto itself.

    I will confess to being partial to dark grey - I think Nielsen has a frame color called "gunmetal" (although most firearms are finished with dark blue) that I like very much ... my close second choice is black. My matting of choice has evolved to a black "main mat" with a white undermat. Generally. Exceptions to this are not rare.

    All one can do is to look at the framed and matted work and decide for oneself - in that mysterious area called "aesthetics" - whether it "works" or not.

    All I have been able to do is to visit the galleries, and after the usual "trying to leave the intellect (Hah!! - As if I had any!!) and opening myself emotionally to the work" ... I study, quite closely, any interesting example of framing/matting, with the idea of future application to my work.

    I guess this is a non-answer ... but, no, I don't know of any "formula" or "rules".
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  4. #4
    Bruce Osgood's Avatar
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    I think the simplest black frame (cheapest) is appropriate and gives the purchaser an opportunity to exercise their own aesthetic (change frames to something you may feel awful) without you losing a 'good' frame. I also mat 11 X 14 (image about 10 X 12) to 16X20 with acid free board in case they like the matt but can cut it down to a new frame.

  5. #5

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    I would not sell a print with a frame unless the buyer requested this and was willing to pay for the extra expense. The frame and matting might not be to their liking.

    Go to any gallery and purchase a print and at the moste you get it mounted in a plastic bag, most of the time you just get the print in a bag.

  6. #6
    Les McLean's Avatar
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    Framing is so subjective and I'm with Jorge on this one. I would not sell a framed print and I certainly wouldn't put it into a cheap frame just to sell. I frame the prints that I have hung at home, mostly other photographers, in either a very light ash or mid brown American Oak and the frames are a flat moulding 3/4" wide. I hate black frames of any description.

  7. #7
    bmac's Avatar
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    The reason I am asking is that I have coworkers who have asked to see some of my prints because they are interested in buying one or more for their home. I think that a ready to hang print would be better in this situation. These aren't necessarly art lovers, just friends who want to help me out.
    hi!

  8. #8

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    Show them the prints without the frames, although in this case it might be best to have one framed--a duplicate of a print you are showing them-- as an example of framing. Use Nielsen metal-section frames. Inexpensive. We use "Contrast Gray" #11, although I still like the extraordinarily conventional slver (#11). White frames are also nice. Black frames can be elegant, too, but they can easily overpower the work. The number refers to the design of the frame. Number 11s are the "standard" Nielsen frame. Number 33s have an elegant narrower face and are particularly suitable for smaller works.

    In back of the mount, you will need an acid-free backing board. Do not use the spring clips that come with the hardware. They are awful. They rust and they make for wavy mounts. Instead, a piece of mat board behind the frame fills the space. If there is a little more space left, cut 1" strips of mat board and use them as spacers.

    There is so much more I could say about frames, but time is short and this should give you a start.

    Michael A. Smith

  9. #9
    Aggie's Avatar
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  10. #10
    bmac's Avatar
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    that would be cool. Let me know the details
    hi!

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