Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,548   Posts: 1,544,547   Online: 990
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 17 of 17
  1. #11
    ted_smith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    uk
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    396
    Images
    1
    Accidental double post.
    Ted Smith Photography
    Hasselblad 501CM...my 2nd love.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Salop, UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    67
    Without knowing the type of photographs you're talking about, I'd have thought they wouldn't have too much appeal beyond the dog's owners themselves. On that basis you're better off trying to pacify this owner rather than wind them up further. I suspect if I were in your position I'd craft a reply to her saying something along the lines of, I'm sorry she isn't happy about the photograph of her dog being made available to other people, as result I'd offer her a free print and offer to donate the 'cost' to the charity yourself.

    I wouldn't apologise for taking the photo, not asking her permission, or for advertising the print for sale, at the same time I'd also avoid pointing out that you don't actually need her consent - which will probably just aggravate the situation further. Finally, I'd remove the picture of her pooch from the website so she can't then come back a second time moaning that it's still on offer! In practice you probably aren't limiting your sales too much by removing 'her' pet pooch, and for the cost of a complimentary print you'll hopefully have a content pet owner who won't take the matter further. You're unlikely to convince her that you didn't need her permission in the first place, so there's not much point trying!

  3. #13
    viridari's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina [USA]
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    330
    Images
    22
    Original poster is in the UK and I see some Americans are trying to apply interpretation of US law. Be careful.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    328
    Be sure to check with the dog's agent...

    paulie

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Van Buren, Arkansas
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    2,412
    Images
    101
    I have a weekend cottage in a small picturesque Arkansas town. There was a movie being filmed on the street my house is on. The producer insisted on getting a release from me, even though they were not actually going to use my house, rather it "might" be seen in the distance if they shot down the street. I found it odd that they needed a release for this, since all that would be seen was what was publically visible.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    san jose, ca
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,542
    Images
    77
    Amazing. If you can sell pictures of other peoples dogs to someone not related, you are in the wrong business. You are a SALESMAN my boy.

    Don't get me wrong, I have three dogs, (three cats, two parrots, and five tanks of fish) but I could give a damn less about a picture of someone elses canine, even if it was a Westminster champion.

    tim in san jose
    Where ever you are, there you be.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN US
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,275
    Images
    4
    First, very good of you to donate the profits to charity.

    Second, it's hard for me to think that someone would want a "portrait" of someone else's dog. I can understand, perhaps, a photo that depicts the breed doing what the breed is designed to do, but not an individually recognizable dog.

    Regardless, I can understand the owner's reaction. They come in for a sitting (I'm inferring a bit from your original post) and you sell a portrait of their dog to someone else. It's not quite the same as displaying photos as part of your portfolio or capturing their pet's image as part of a scene (say as part of a group of dogs).

    But you might find that if people have the opportunity to "opt in" they may be quite willing. A statement to the effect that these charity efforts are supported by sales of dog portraits to owners and others, with the ability to give permission to do so, will garner a fair number of approvals. Adding that a portion of your profits will be donated to the dog charity (following through of course) will probably improve the approval rate. As well as possible sales.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin