Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,222   Posts: 1,532,461   Online: 1150
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19
  1. #1
    ZoneIII's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Illinois
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    247
    Images
    35

    Need opinions about appearance of pictures on my website.

    This is one of those questions that really doesn't fit into any categories that I can find on APUG but I want to post it here because I have found that APUGs members are the most knowledgeable people to go to with something like this. I realize that my question dips into the digital realm because it's about how scanned images look on a website but I only shoot film. I am an analog photographer exclusively.

    I have a client that asked that I get something on the Internet so that their buyers can choose pictures to purchase. I had promised myself to build a website for years but never got around to it so, in desperation, I got some pictures together and got hosting and a domain and uploaded a Jalbum portfolio within 24 hours. (It isn't what I eventually want as far as a comprehensive website goes but at least it got something online for that client.)

    Most people say the images look fine (technically) but two people say that the images look really bad.. too dark, etc. (I am not asking for a critique of my pictures. I am asking about how they appear from a technical standpoint... i.e. calibration.) Two weeks ago, a photographer who has a calibrated monitor said that the images on my website look terrible from a calibration standpoint - brightness, contrast, color, saturation, etc. Because he calibrates his monitor with a Spider, that concerned me.

    A week ago, I went to my daughter's house and looked at my website using her monitor. They looked terrible! They were dark, too contrasty, over-saturated, and murky. But other Internet pictures look fine on her monitor. I asked her why she hadn't mentioned this to me before and she was surprised by my question because she thought they looked good which demonstrates that subjective judgments are difficult to go by. (They looked REALLY bad!)

    I don't have a Spider or other monitor or calibration tool and I just use a program that came with my Samsung monitor. It's much better than Adobe Gamma but it's still subjective, of course. My pictures look about the same on my new monitor as they did on my old one that failed recently. But here's what really has me stumped: If my monitor was adjusted incorrectly, shouldn't other pictures that I view on the Internet look bad on it? But everything looks fine on my monitor. My pictures look good and so does other Internet pictures that I view. On my daughter's monitor, everything looks good except pictures on my website (???)

    So now I'm not sure what's going on. I want to be confident that what I see is approximately what other people see, of course. I'm planning a comprehensive website so this is a problem I want to solve.

    I would really appreciate it if some APUG members could go to http://tjohnstonphoto.com and let me know if it looks like I have a serious calibration problem. Again, I do not want a critique of the pictures. I just want to know if there appears to be a calibration problem. Some pictures simply could be adjusted better so I'm not asking about very fine calibration things. I got those the pictures together and up so fast that they aren't all adjusted exactly the way I would like them. I'm asking if the pictures IN GENERAL look too dark, contrasty, saturated, etc. And I would also appreciate any suggestions that might explain what may be going on. Being an old analog person, I don't fully understand calibration, color spaces, and all of that. For now, I just want to know how to ensure that my website pictures look O.K. on any well calibrated monitor. BTW, I noticed that some of the thumbnails look dark on my monitor but the pictures look O.K. when opened. That may have something to do with the compression of the thumbnails so be sure to open a few images. Please check a few b&w images too. I'm very curious to see if I have real problem on my hands or if the monitor's that they look bad on might be calibrated incorrectly.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    rthomas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,103

    Looks good to me!

    Tom,
    My main computer is a Mac Mini with a 24" Dell LCD monitor, calibrated with a Gretag-Macbeth i1. I currently use this display for a digital archiving project; the color and monochrome images I scan, from large and medium format, are reviewed on other people's calibrated monitors as well. I have complete trust in my monitor's color profile.

    On my monitor most of your images display with seemingly accurate color and density. There are some individual images that look slightly underexposed to me, such as Beach, Prince Edward Island, but that's not so much a function of the monitor as it is the individual's taste for a particular photograph.

    I hope this helps; I'm not sure why images that look good on my system would look bad on another accurately calibrated display.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Long Island, New York
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,067
    I have a new HP with a 24" monitor and the shots do look a little "harsh". I'm not techie, but I was once told that images for the web should only be about 100 dpi. I did note that the images took a couple of seconds to fully download even with a relatively fast computer - could it be that there's too much info for a screen to handle unless it's calibrated, (mine isn't). I would also think that the majority of clients etc viewing your web site would NOT have calibrated monitors.

    BTW - excellent photographs. I may just chuck it in!!!!
    "Why is there always a better way?"

  4. #4
    lorirfrommontana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Montana
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    424
    Blog Entries
    5
    Images
    50
    I think that they look good on my monitor, not that I'm any kind of expert!
    -Lori

  5. #5
    yardkat's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Salt Lake City, UT
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    170
    Images
    5
    Looks pretty good on my monitor. I have calibrated my monitor. I really like "Bishop Hill, IL", I think it's really gorgeous light.
    I don't really think anything looks "harsh", but a couple things look maybe a little sort of oversharpened, like "Badlands National Park, SD", for instance. Your color work is really lovely.

  6. #6
    DWThomas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    SE Pennsylvania
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,222
    Images
    64
    They look good here; some may appear different in terms of exposure or saturation from what I might have chosen, but they don't look "off'". I'm running (as of fairly recently) an Acer 20" LCD monitor. So far, my calibration has consisted of setting it up with a step chart .GIF file on screen. Some day when I am afflicted with too much surplus cash I may invest in a real calibrator.

    That "Fall Colors, Road, Keweenaw Peninsula, MI" could have been taken here in Pennsylvania, has a nice "I've been there" sense to me.

    DaveT

  7. #7
    Marco B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,983
    Images
    169
    A few tips:

    - If you are making money with your pictures, and are seriously concerned about the exact appearance of the pictures on the internet, there really is no excuse for NOT buying a calibration device. Get one, even a cheaper 99 dollar version of the Spider or ColorMonki or something will be better than what you do yourself.

    - Second, get a colormanagement aware software package. Now Photoshop CS is probably overkill, so get Photoshop Album.

    - Third, after having these things done, start working AdobeRGB colorspace during scanning. This is not that difficult, since most scanners scan to AdobeRGB anyway, or have a setting for that.

    - Fourth, now working in AdobeRGB is OK for "home-printing", as it will allow brighter greens than sRGB, but NOT for display on the internet. You need to CONVERT each image from the AdobeRGB colorspace to sRGB. This should be an option in Photoshop Album. Save these as separate images from the originals. In Photoshop CS(1-4), you could do this in batch by choosing "File/Scripts/Image processor."

    Currently, your images DO NOT have an included colorspace, as I checked that in Photoshop. This will mean that the images are displayed without guarantees about color rendering, even if the user has a calibrated monitor and colormanaged webbrowser. If you convert to sRGB, you don't have this issue since most monitors approximately match the sRGB colorspace, see the next point, Jeffrey has written a really good article about this.

    - Fifth, read this excellent introduction to colormanagement and display of images on the web and why it can go wrong by Jeffrey Friedl, I think it will explain a lot about your issues. It is a seven page blog article, I recommend you to read it all, it will definitely help and he explains things in a understandable way, better than I can do in a short post here:

    http://regex.info/blog/photo-tech/color-spaces-page1

    - Six: even if you do all this, you should be aware that, even with well calibrated monitors on both computer platforms, there may be a noticeable difference between Apple and Windows machines. This has to do with the way especially older Macs used to be calibrated, which differed from Windows (technical term Gamma, that differed)

    The good thing: On my calibrated monitor, most images look fine, maybe the colors a bit oversaturated, but that maybe how you intended it, but it may also be related to not having included the colorspace and converted to sRGB.
    My website

    "The nineteenth century began by believing that what was reasonable was true, and it wound up by believing that what it saw a photograph of, was true." - William M. Ivins Jr.

    "I don't know, maybe we should disinvent color, and we could just shoot Black & White." - David Burnett in 1978

    "Analog is chemistry + physics, digital is physics + math, which ones did you like most?"

  8. #8
    MurrayMinchin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    North Coast, BC, Canada
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    4,195
    Images
    15
    I've got an iMac and your B&W section is as sumptuously rich as the best sites I've visited. Easily as good as Lynn Radeka's site, which is saying a lot!!

    Murray
    _________________________________________
    Note to self: Turn your negatives into positives.

  9. #9
    ann
    ann is offline

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    2,869
    Images
    26
    i calibrate my monitor about every two weeks with color munki.
    They look fine.
    Lots of pop.

    A couple in the people gallery seem a bit contrasty, but that could just be a personal thing. (certainly a lot better than a lot of flat stuff out there on the "air wave".
    http://www.aclancyphotography.com

  10. #10
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Tufts University
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,750
    Images
    5
    Looks fine to me. Nice work BTW.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin