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  1. #1

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    Portfolio options

    Considering the various options for building a portfolio from the printing and presentation standpoint two broad options seem apparent:

    1. A collection of prints gathered together in some sort of book format.

    2. A collection of prints mounted and matted, presented in a box.

    The second option appeals more at the moment, and means prints can be looked at separately, as well as seeming more substantial. However, I'd be interested to know other experiences of producing portfolios for 'fine art' or other types of photography. If using the 'box of prints' format the consideration of print size arises, e.g. does one make all prints on 9 1/2"x12" or 11"x14" paper specifically for a portfolio presentation or is "full wall size" a better option...

    Tom

  2. #2

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    portfolio presentations

    there are so many ways to do a presentation that you really need to think outside the box....there is a fine book about making these type presentations...accordion; open box; loose and on and on....the book might take some looking around on amazon but I do own it somewhere...maybe others will chime in here....if you have serious customers the traditional clamshell box is the classiest with some sort of engraving on the cover...good luck to you!!!
    best, Peter

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Schrager View Post
    there are so many ways to do a presentation that you really need to think outside the box....there is a fine book about making these type presentations...accordion; open box; loose and on and on....the book might take some looking around on amazon but I do own it somewhere...maybe others will chime in here....if you have serious customers the traditional clamshell box is the classiest with some sort of engraving on the cover...good luck to you!!!
    best, Peter
    I wonder how well loose prints would hold up in a portfolio situation. If presenting the whole sheet of paper then presentation concerns are involved in terms of getting right angles, lack of drying clip marks etc. to give a clean result.

    Tom.

  4. #4

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    Check out Brooks Jensen's folio concept - http://www.brooksjensenarts.com/foliodesc.html

    He is the editor of Lenswork, published in the NW USA.
    Their website - http://www.lenswork.com/
    He has spent a lot of time considering portfolio options.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by George Collier View Post
    Check out Brooks Jensen's folio concept - http://www.brooksjensenarts.com/foliodesc.html

    He is the editor of Lenswork, published in the NW USA.
    Their website - http://www.lenswork.com/
    He has spent a lot of time considering portfolio options.
    Brooks Jensen does have an interesting concept for a portfolio as a product; which is much lighter in many senses compared to a large clamshell box with mounted and matted prints. I can particularly see Brooks Jensen's format working well for multiple copies and presentation of specific collections of photographs.

    Tom.

  6. #6

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    Jensen has also developed (quite some time ago, early in the technology curve) of a hybrid of sorts for prints. You would make a finished print in the darkroom, send it to Lenswork, they would scan at very high res, output a very fine screen halftone neg (at least 300lpi) which could be then contacted onto the same fiber paper to facilitate the making of archival fiber prints which were very difficult to tell - at arm's length - from the original.
    The market purpose of these prints was not intended to be equal to the original hand make print, but could satisfy the middle ground of something distributable for lower cost. I don't know if he still offers this.



 

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