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  1. #11
    bsdunek's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu View Post
    I suggest a more near by co-op.
    I at one time was a member of a mixed
    arts and crafts co-op gallery. We shared
    space rental costs. Some one or ones
    were on hand when open. Dan
    A much better suggestion, dancqu. My Wife and I are members of two of this type of gallery. No charges until you sell, and then it's 40% to the gallery. That's what pays the rent. In this way there is incentive for the gallery to sell. At 'rent-the-wall' galleries, they don't seem to care if they sell or not - just keep the walls covered!
    Bruce

    Moma don't take my Kodachrome away!
    Oops, Kodak just did!


    BruceCSdunekPhotography.zenfolio.com

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by bsdunek View Post
    At 'rent-the-wall' galleries, they don't seem to care if they sell or not - just keep the walls covered!
    i just realized that we should be charging them to rent the work for their walls.
    in the commercial-world it is called a "usage fee" ...
    and if it sells off the wall, they take a commission like a traditional gallery.
    im empty, good luck

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    I just realized that we should be charging them to rent
    the work for their walls.
    Or, as suppliers of merchandise, cash in advance or on
    approved credit. Dan

  4. #14
    Andrew Horodysky's Avatar
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    Stay away from these kinds of galleries. They're called "vanity" galleries. Following some sort of contact with them, whether it's subscribing to e-newsletters, visiting the gallery, unsolicited correspondence, they often attempt to contact artists for submission of work. Upon "evaluation" and follow-up critique, a sales letter (of sorts) goes out informing the artist of their "exemplary talent(s)", with an offer to exhibit. This usually turns out to be a solicitation for the artist to pay heavy fees for "advertising" (in a journal that no one sees or reads), rental of wall space (in linear feet), subsidising of opening receptions, payment of announcement printing and mailing, etc. In the end, you're out of a lot of money, and end up no further in your "art" career.

    The quality of work shown in most of these kinds of galleries is second rate, at best. The gallerists don't really do much of anything to promote your work; YOU'RE the one covering the costs of showing in the space. There's RARELY any critical review (most writers stay clear of these places, anyway). Be careful when approaching them.

    A quality gallery or dealer will not take any money from you (be aware, however, it's a sweaty business, and many artists have been "taken for a ride" in the past, even by so-called reputable dealers); normally (as stated in previous posts above), you're compensated about 50% of any sales with the dealer, following approval of representation. He/she will pay for promotion, sales efforts, framing (sometimes split with the artist), etc. Some artists are even fortunate to get an income/stipend (usually against sales) on a monthly basis to cover production expenses. An organization that can help with deciphering gallery contracts and legalese is the Volunteer Lawyers of the Arts (http://www.vlany.org); they charge nothing, or sometimes a very nominal fee for their counsel.

    For quality art exhibitions in New York and beginning reference for the types of galleries offering the best quality art and representation, check out the following: http://www.artdealers.org (ADAA - Art Dealers Association of America) and http://www.aipad.com (Association of International Photography Art Dealers). The gallerists and dealers belonging to these organizations abide -- usually -- by agreed-upon business, sales, and representation guidelines, and professional industry ethics.

    Good luck.

  5. #15
    photo8x10's Avatar
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    Thank you everyone for yours advice, I decided t say NO at their offer, and I'm going to accept their offer from Germany, but I'm looking at the links that you had wrote down to see for a good gallery there in USA.
    Thank so much...

    Stefano
    Digital is Slow..........Analog is ROCK!!!!

    Visit me at http://www.stefanogermi.com
    Visit My Portfolio in Apug

  6. #16
    Andrew Horodysky's Avatar
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    Stefano,

    The links I provided are just a starting point. These organizations are the "elite", and the member galleries-dealers are a good place to start looking to see who's doing what in New York and other locations around the country. New York is not the Alpha-Omega of art and exhibition. There are also numerous other venues: restaurants, independent book stores, upscale wine stores, etc. Not to sound patronizing (and I apologize if I come off that way), but begin finding valuable relationships in your own "backyard".

    I live in the metro New York City area, but one of my favorite art galleries is the Michael Werner Gallery in Koln... go figure.

  7. #17
    SuzanneR's Avatar
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    The most elite galleries tend to have full rosters. To get into such galleries means you already have a proven sales record with your work. I agree, local galleries and venues are the best place to start when seeking representation. And with the internet, a lot can be accomplished on your own without the 50% commission.

    All that said, I have found Edward Winkleman's blog full of good information about the gallery scene, especially in New York. The link below is to a particularly useful post, but you might get a cup of coffee, and really read through his blog. It's full of good information.

    http://edwardwinkleman.blogspot.com/...g-gallery.html

  8. #18
    Andrew Horodysky's Avatar
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    Nice suggestion, Suzanne.

  9. #19
    photo8x10's Avatar
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    I've just put on eye on your link Suzanne, very nice....
    now it's quite late, but tomorrow I'm getting a big cup of tea better with good chocolate cookies and I'm starting to read it carefully....

    Stefano
    Digital is Slow..........Analog is ROCK!!!!

    Visit me at http://www.stefanogermi.com
    Visit My Portfolio in Apug

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