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  1. #11
    Mark Antony's Avatar
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    Dan you are using a cheap laptop? If so getting accurate density is problematic as you are probably working on an un-calibrated system and the off axis display can often be poor.
    You can make yourself a step wedge in PS to check all the tonal values are visible I show you how here:
    http://unsharp-mask.blogspot.com/200...photoshop.html

    Scan at the maximum optical resolution your scanner is capable of say 2400-4000ppi (for film) or 300dpi for a 8x10 print then downsize in your image editor to 800 pixels wide, save as jpg the file size will be OK at about 250k or quality 10 - dpi is irrelevant web browsers will take care of display.
    If you have a poor monitor check the histogram for ballpark tone values. Also when you scan look at the histogram and try not to clip off too much info-this is setting the black and white points.
    Almost any image can be scanned, their are some images that are harder such as Kodachrome slides that have very high d-max but if you set the black and white points in your scan software they should look OK
    Last edited by Mark Antony; 06-15-2009 at 08:58 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: clarity

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Antony View Post
    Scan at the maximum optical resolution your scanner is capable of say 2400-4000ppi (for film)
    I wouldn't say that it is always best to scan at maximum resolution. First of all, the optical resolution of a scanner is not always usable. This is particularly true of flatbed scanners, which can NEVER produce a good scan of film at maximum resolution. For instance, my Epson 4180 perfection has a maximum optical resolution of 4800dpi - higher than my Nikon Coolscan V, which is only 4000dpi. Does this mean that the Epson will make a sharper scan than the Nikon? NO WAY!!!! Scans on the Epson don't really start to look sharp until you get below around 2000dpi. Then there is the issue of the picture itself. Honestly, I have NEVER seen a slide that can REALLY take advantage of 4000dpi. So I just have to ask myself why I should bother with such a high resolution scan. Of course, if time is not too important, there is nothing wrong with scanning at the highest resolution and dropping it down in post processing.

  3. #13
    Mark Antony's Avatar
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    my Epson 4180 perfection has a maximum optical resolution of 4800dpi - higher than my Nikon Coolscan V, which is only 4000dpi. Does this mean that the Epson will make a sharper scan than the Nikon? NO WAY!!!!


    Matt
    Your Epson may state it has optical 4800 but it actually measures at under 2400, no flatbed will achieve its theoretical resolution because of the way the film is held on the glass, even when wet scanned the focus is approximate. Your Nikon on the other hand can focus on the film itself thus giving a better chance of getting its resolution.
    I have seen films that contain detail that can be captured exceeding 4000 ppi but these are rare and exceptional but as a rule of thumb film scanners work well at 2800-4000 then taken down to web size flatbeds are better for MF/LF and flat artwork with 2400 and 300ppi being good starting points.
    Much better than scanning at 72 ppi at 800 pixels then uploading to internet.

  4. #14

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    Any trick or tricks to it? I'll use the manage
    attachments option. A 139KB PNG file from
    a 5x7 print. Dan

  5. #15

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    Now Stymied. Have I the Gear - Software?

    I've viewed many APUG Photo posts. In my estimation,
    A lot of good looking representations of the actual prints.
    And that on my Proview 15 inch monitor.

    My scans look harsh with the appearance of increased
    contrast. Gradation is rough. I've an Apple running
    OS X 10.5. I've used only 10.5's included Image
    capture and Preview applications for input
    and alterations.

    The Canon MP520 provides 16 bit input, 8 bit output
    gray gradation. Image capture allows for TIFF, JPEG,
    PNG, and PDF image files. No variations of any.

    So can any one see where the weak point or points
    are with my setup. Perhaps additional software?

    BTW, 16 in 8 out? I've looked but not found any
    explanation. Assistance appreciated. Dan

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