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  1. #21

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    Why don't you give us a link to the photo and ask us how much we would pay for it?

  2. #22

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    Don't undersell yourself. That's the worst.

    The market is what you can make of it.

  3. #23

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    perhaps you should go to a local art fair
    and see what people are charging for photography.
    there are a handful of fairs in rhode island ( wickford + scituate ) and
    on cape cod ( chatham and beyond ) ...

    in all internet forums everyone is an expert about everything
    but without knowledge of the local market, it is not much help ...

    good luck
    john
    Last edited by jnanian; 06-18-2009 at 10:18 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    silver magnets, trickle tanks sold
    artwork often times sold for charity
    PM me for details

  4. #24
    bsdunek's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WolfTales View Post
    Don't undersell yourself. That's the worst.

    The market is what you can make of it.
    I did this years ago when I started to sell my photographs. The gallery I was in finally enlightened me. I took my work out for a while and then put it back at higher prices suggested by the gallery. Things sold better!
    Bruce

    Moma don't take my Kodachrome away!
    Oops, Kodak just did!


    BruceCSdunekPhotography.zenfolio.com

  5. #25

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    I hope this helps, it is our price list:

    http://www.lightwisps.com/PriceList/index.htm

    The funny thing is that we sell very few 8X10s but a lot of the larger prints.

    Good luck and email me any time.

    Don

  6. #26
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    One thing that really jumps out at you at shows like AIPAD is that what sells is big and in color. Doesn't matter the genre or quality of the work or how you produced it. Vintage stuff by Weston and Sommer goes a beggin' while photographers like Crewdson and Soth rake in unbelievable money. If you're trying to sell it as art, make it big (really big - like 4'x6') and in color.

  7. #27

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    Start at $100 for an 8X10
    Next show start at $150

    Ilfochome or digital prints = smoke and mirrors for most people...

    BUT -
    If your images have strong visual content well seen and presented you should start much higher.
    Its the idea and content that counts. A signed digital ink jet print by Picasso is still a Picasso...


    Finally, you only lower your price if buyer wants multiple prints.

    Per Volquartz
    http://www.pervolquartz.com

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by per volquartz View Post

    Finally, you only lower your price if buyer wants multiple prints.

    Per Volquartz
    http://www.pervolquartz.com
    Selling outside of a gallery situation?

    Tom.

  9. #29

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    Hi Ektagraphic,

    Having someone say "I love your work and I want it on my wall - here's some money" is just the best feeling. I had the pleasure of selling three large prints in one night for £75 (abt. $100 US) each at my final year exhibition at Uni. I was told it was a very reasonable price in 2007; if I had the opportunity to sell work today I'd certainly charge £100+ (abt. $150) for the same prints.

    My tip - be a real sniffy perfectionist. Make sure your prints are properly developed, fixed, archivally washed and pristine, with no visible dust marks, blotches or other defects. The last thing you want is your print that you charged $100 for discolouring on someone's wall in five years. You may think 'Oh nobody will notice that little spot in the corner', but if you can see it, someone else will. Make sure the matting and framing are straight and perfect, no dust or fingermarks inside the glass. Use a simple, tasteful frame. Signing and numbering the print is your choice - I do sign and number my prints. Who knows, you might be collectible one day.

    Then, as the others have said, price your prints reasonably but not cheaply. Make sure people know what they're getting for their money, and why they should pay more for Ilfochromes than inkjets. What if someone asks "His prints are far cheaper than yours - why?".

    Be proud of your work, and I wish you well with it.
    testing...

  10. #30
    jpeets's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by per volquartz View Post
    Start at $100 for an 8X10
    Next show start at $150

    Ilfochome or digital prints = smoke and mirrors for most people...

    BUT -
    If your images have strong visual content well seen and presented you should start much higher.
    Its the idea and content that counts. A signed digital ink jet print by Picasso is still a Picasso...


    Finally, you only lower your price if buyer wants multiple prints.

    Per Volquartz
    http://www.pervolquartz.com
    The primary value of your print is the image - does it appeal to a potential buyer? If they are drawn to an image, all else is secondary: important, perhaps, but secondary. Emphasizing that it is a limited edition, crowing about your choice of medium, talking about the difficulty of making the shot, etc. are all pure marketing, and if convincing, can increase what a buyer might be prepared to pay.

    As others have noted, a high quality presentation (professional looking matting, mounting, etc.) is absolutely necessary for your work to be taken seriously. An appropriate price is also important: most people are insecure about distinguishing good from bad art, and (naively) may use price as a guideline. As pointed out elsewhere, you can kill sales by going too low (or too high). In your case, where you have a significant cost of have someone make the print for you, I would at least double your cost in setting the price.

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