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  1. #11
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    I use a plexiglass cleaner -- it contains an anti-static solution. Can't remember the name of it. Since I sometimes use plex, it is nice to have around.

    Vaughn
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  2. #12

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    I used to use glass cleaner, but not any more. The ingredients list on "Glass Plus" really doesn't give you any idea of what they have in there. I've switched to using 91% Isopropyl alcohol, on these little round cotton pads my wife uses for skin care or whatever. Both are available at any drug store. The alcohol has no fragrance or other additives, (the inert ingredient is purified water), it cleans quite well and evaporates very quickly with no residue. The added bounus is that I can use the same alcohol and pads to clean negatives.

    Regards,

    Dave

  3. #13
    Mick Fagan's Avatar
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    Dave, regarding the 91% Isopropyl alcohol, I would be cautious of using that on the emulsion side of a negative.

    With 9% water, you are effectively wetting the emulsion slightly, this can make it swell ever so slightly, but more importantly, it can then be attractive to dust particles.

    If this happens and the emulsion dries with an embedded dust particle, then things are possibly a bit grimmer than before you started your cleaning regime.

    I too have some Isopropyl alcohol, but mine is 99.5%, which is closer to the last of the Kodak film cleaner that I have. I have never used this for film cleaning, probably never will, as it is used for my work.

    I also use Windex, have so for decades on various exposing units where we were making duplicate film copies for lithographic film separations. I use it in my work for the manufacture of film negatives in rubber stamp manufacturing, lastly I use it for my contact frame in the darkroom when making contact sheets, or any other contact darkroom procedure.

    For framing, I use Windex as well, however in all cases you really do have to wait until any residue has dried up, then re-wipe with a lint free cloth. The best lint free cloth I know of is any genuine linen tea towel that is worn and well used and of course clean.

    Mick.

  4. #14
    fdi
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    I own a picture frame company and my employees prefer to use Sprayway Glass Cleaner. It is avaiable at Walmart. The most critical aspect is that you use an ammonia free glass cleaner because ammonia is harmful to most artwork. Sprayway is a foam style cleaner that helps reduce streaking.

    For acrylic we use and sell Brillianize.

    Cheers,
    Mark

  5. #15

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    For glass -
    Whatever is used for the actual cleaning of the glass, I have always found that a soft cotton (cheese-cloth, an old but clean T-shirt, etc) cloth with a light dampening of water (you'll figure out how much) will remove any last streaking from chemical cleaners. As you use a cloth with Windex, etc. on multiple sides and pieces of glass, it's easy to start transferring grime. The clean cotton / water final wipe removes this.
    For plexiglass (lucite, I think is the generic term)-
    As Mark says, Brillianize is best, at least for me, and can be found in some hardware stores. It leaves a nice finish, and removes static charge. When matting and framing, I do the matte, get all the layers together, and assemble the frame. Then I take the protective covering off the lucite on borh sides and clean with the Brillianize. Then align the edge of the lucite along the edge of the matte / print stack, like a hinge, with the print lying on its back on the table. Then blow off the facing sides of lucite and print (the cloth dampened with Brillianize serves as a nice picker upper for final lint off of the lucite.) Then carefully lower the lucite onto the matted print. At this point, you can slide it into the frame and put on the 4th side.

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