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  1. #21
    Marco B's Avatar
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    That is not such a bad idea actually if all the people involved are living close together. If one of them has an officially registered business, the might even be able to buy at distributor prices... But I am not sure if it could really be done practically, and if a distributor would accept it.
    My website

    "The nineteenth century began by believing that what was reasonable was true, and it wound up by believing that what it saw a photograph of, was true." - William M. Ivins Jr.

    "I don't know, maybe we should disinvent color, and we could just shoot Black & White." - David Burnett in 1978

    "Analog is chemistry + physics, digital is physics + math, which ones did you like most?"

  2. #22
    Marco B's Avatar
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    Ok guys,

    As I was really interested to see the difference with high grade museumglass, I have now bought a small piece of Claryl that fitted a frame in my house currently carrying museumglass. Please note that I have forgotten the make of this museumglass, but I do know it is of the highest grade anti-reflection and UV coated. It might be Tru Vue, ClearColour or Schott glass...

    I think I can now confirm CMO's observations, although in a slightly more positive form:

    - The coating of Claryl is actually not so much bleu-ish, but purplish
    - Under the worst kind of lighting conditions (direct light of a window coming from the back when you are viewing it), the museumglass definitely has the edge, as the Claryl's coating will show up more clearly than the almost neutral coating of the museumglass. In this kind of situation, the museumglass wins.
    - However, under more favourable lighting conditions (and this will be most of the cases), the Claryl does very good, and is almost indistinguishable from the museumglass. The glass is virtually invisible than, as with museumglass.
    - When viewing the framed photo from an odd angle (<45 degrees), I have the distinct feeling the anti-reflection of Claryl is actually working slightly better than that of the museumglass. If I remember well, DSM claimed the coating to have some of the widest "viewing angles". There may be some truth in this, although the difference is small compared to museumglass.
    - I was slightly worried that the coating might affect the "colour" or warmth of the image and used matt, causing a cooling down. However, when viewing under favourable lighting conditions, I can now state that the Claryl's glass doesn't visibly negatively affect the image or matt colour. In fact, I couldn't see the difference in matting colour (broken white) between the Claryl and the museumglass. So this is positive.

    So what is my end-verdict?

    - If you are going to display a number of photos under the worst kind of lighting conditions, and you have an unlimited budget, well, than by all means get the highest grade museumglass, as you will be slightly better off with displaying your photos.

    - If, however, your budget like mine is limited, but you do want good high transmittance framing glass with more than acceptable anti-reflection to show off your work in the best possible way, than Claryl is definitely worth considering taking into account it's significantly lower price. In fact, since a week or two I know I will have an upcoming exhibition, and I am seriously going to consider framing in Claryl.

    Please do note again Claryl doesn't feature an UV coating (yet), so watercolor paintings etc. might still be better off with museumglass.

    Marco
    Last edited by Marco B; 07-23-2009 at 09:14 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    My website

    "The nineteenth century began by believing that what was reasonable was true, and it wound up by believing that what it saw a photograph of, was true." - William M. Ivins Jr.

    "I don't know, maybe we should disinvent color, and we could just shoot Black & White." - David Burnett in 1978

    "Analog is chemistry + physics, digital is physics + math, which ones did you like most?"

  3. #23
    Shawn Dougherty's Avatar
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    Thanks for the in depth review and bringing this to our attention, Marco! I'm definately going to order in a bit if it does become available in the US this fall.

  4. #24
    bill spears's Avatar
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    Yes - interesting to hear these observations and thanks for the research.
    I don't think the lack of a UV coating is too much an issue when pictures are mostly displayed indoors and fine prints are usually (should be)archivally toned aswell.
    I'll be eager to give it a try if I can source it.

  5. #25
    Akki14's Avatar
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    Have just ordered this for a platinum print I'm having framed. Should be back in 2 weeks so I can give my verdict then. It wasn't too costly and "museumglass" wasn't an option at this framers.
    ~Heather
    oooh shiny!
    http://www.stargazy.org/

  6. #26
    Marco B's Avatar
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    Hi all,

    To be honest, I need to revise my last post and opinion a bit. Since I had an exhibition running during part of August and Septembre, and couldn't afford museumglass for all these frames, I decided to go with the Claryl. I did have a few older frames that did have true museumglass for comparison, and that were on display as well.

    However, since I now had the need to work longer with it, and see it in a different situation than at home, I have to revise my opinion somewhat.

    I think CMO stated it best: "It is something inbetween"...

    It definitely does not reach the very good anti-reflective properties of museumglass. You will see reflections. It still is an improvement over normal glass, mainly due to the fact that the glass does not contain iron, and hence does not have a color cast. And the coating does some work.

    BUT, the glass could use a serious upgrade of the anti-reflective coating. I think the main difference with museumglass, althought I do not know this for sure, is that museumglass is probably multi-coated, and Claryl probably only single coated. This makes a considerable difference in the anti-reflective properties.

    In addition, the Claryl glass can be quite difficult to clean, and the coating has a tendency to show leopard skin like spots, something I have seen reported in other forums as well. Fortunately, under normal circumstances you don't see this, and I definitely did NOT see it when the exhibition hang, but it did show under strong light while trying to clean it.

    I followed DSM's instructions for cleaning, but would recommend using plain 70% alcohol in de-mineralized water instead of spirit, as the latter house hold variant at least seems to contains some kind of colourant.

    Using a circular movement with a microfibre cloth, directly followed by a similar procedure with a clean cotton tea-towel, seemed to work quite well for cleaning. Anyway, I am not an expert on glass cleaning, so probably some other people can do a better job, but cleaning Claryl may be a bit more difficult than other types of glass...

    Anyway: did I regret getting it? No, not at all, and I still enjoy watching a number of the Claryl framed pictures in my house.

    But if you can afford it, or have clients willing to pay for it, I would recommend the museumglass.

    I think DSM had some plans for a variant with an UV coating as well, let's see what the future brings and how that glass turns out to be... And maybe the pressure this introduction puts on the framing glass market, will lead to better and more affordable other glass types of other manufacturers as well... lets cross our fingers, because there is a dire need for this in my opinion...

    Marco
    My website

    "The nineteenth century began by believing that what was reasonable was true, and it wound up by believing that what it saw a photograph of, was true." - William M. Ivins Jr.

    "I don't know, maybe we should disinvent color, and we could just shoot Black & White." - David Burnett in 1978

    "Analog is chemistry + physics, digital is physics + math, which ones did you like most?"

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