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Thread: Now what?

  1. #11

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    thomas

    it might not be a bad thing to see if your local public library displays art
    they do not charge a commission as galleries do
    and from what i have read, galleries are kind of struggling
    in this bad economy.

    the main think you might want to do is do research about galleries
    in your area ( or other places ) that display photography or paintings or sketches or ?
    in a similar vein to your portfolio, so you will be a good fit. then write a letter of introduction
    to the gallery and learn what their procedure is for getting an audience.
    and find out what they expect to see, - 4x5 chromes? 35mm chromes? a cd? the real thing?
    learn as much as you can about them .. do they (hopefully) have a group of steady clients ( corporate or private? designers? )
    good walk in traffic so your work gets seen by people who may be interested in collecting it.

    good luck getting your work out there!

    john
    im empty, good luck

  2. #12
    DanielStone's Avatar
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    PUT YOUR WORK IN FRONT OF EVERYONE

    their is reason to my "madness"

    even if someone is not able to financially afford your asking price, they still will be able to enjoy your work. Many people were not able to afford AA's prints (even those made by his assistants), but how many people when you ask them today know about Ansel? Many.

    to be honest, there is no reason not to show your work to everyone, because if you want YOUR pictures to remain in people's heads, you have to show them first. Generally, if you and the gallery (if you use one) make the pricing so that many people can afford to purchase your prints, you can feel assured that your work is getting to the masses.

    Simple business (some logic borrowed from American Gangster <the movie>) "Make a better product(or art in this case), and sell it for less, way less than your competitor, and you will win.

    I personally find people such as Gregory Crewdson to be a little boastful in their work. When a print sells for 100K, they make a good bit of money, and the gallery does as well. But 100k for a print? He has a very select audience obviously who is able to afford his work.

    I've found in my simple, personal experience, set a price for your work and DO NOT DEVIATE FROM IT. Say, $200 for an over-matted 8x8 or so print. If someone wants it bad enough, they will get it. You're not charging a horrendous amount, but enough to cover your time, expenses, and then simply double what you put into it financially. This is my way of pricing.

    definitely matte(at least over-matte) your work if you show it to a gallery. It will show how serious you are, and that you mean business, not just wasting their time and money to put your work up.

    They want to make money, just like you. Otherwise you wouldn't be asking about selling .

    Stieglitz and Steichen had this same argument, both won. Steichen didn't see a problem with making money from his art, Stieglitz did. He believed that art has to be made for art's sake, not for eventual payment. In the end, both have made quite a good deal of money on prints, even after their deaths.


    -Dan


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