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  1. #1

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    Good frames for frequent swapping?

    Hi all--

    Last year, I started hanging 4 prints in my front hallway, which I rotate every couple of months. I'm using some pretty cheap wooden frames I got from Michaels, but I'm looking for something nicer, and I'm looking to expand the number of prints I have up, now that I've ordered better lighting. It's purely a vanity thing...this isn't my business, it's just to show off and impress my friends when they come visit, so lower-cost might be nice.

    I'm looking for a good-quality, good-looking frame that's easy to swap images in and out of. I don't like the clip-style "frameless" frames. I *do* like the Nielsen metal frames, and the flexibility in terms of frame sizes, but I don't like the idea of having to dis-assemble and re-assemble every time I want to hang new prints. But I generally like the slim, contemporary look of black metal frames.

    If I could find metal frames that had retention clips like a wood frame, that would be perfect.

    Any suggestions out there? Maybe I'm not searching all that well, but the Nielsen frames (or clones thereof) seem to be the only thing I find.

    Thanks--

    Greg

  2. #2
    ann
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    you only have to remove one rail to switch out photos with a metal frame, which is faster than remove the tacks , etc from a wooden frame.
    http://www.aclancyphotography.com

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by gmikol View Post
    Hi all--

    I *do* like the Nielsen metal frames, and the flexibility in terms of frame sizes, but I don't like the idea of having to dis-assemble and re-assemble every time I want to hang new prints. But I generally like the slim, contemporary look of black metal frames.
    I use this sort of frame and they are very easy to open. 2 screws is all that need loosening to open them.

    EDIT : yeah, what Ann said

  4. #4
    DWThomas's Avatar
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    What the previous two posters said. But another possibility -- a year or two back I got some frames at Target that were simple gallery style frames made with a panel in the back. The panel rested in a groove at one end and had some little toggles to turn and anchor the other three edges. The panel appeared to be painted Masonite, or similar. The frame section was deep enough the frame could be flush against the wall. The major downside was that their "16x20" appeared to be more like 15 15/16 x 19 15/16 inches (where most frames include an extra 1/16 or so beyond the nominal dimension), which caused me some grief. At any rate, work in such a frame could be swapped out very quickly (if it fits!)

  5. #5
    MikeSeb's Avatar
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    Stephen Schaub at figitalrevolution.com has blogged recently about some of the alternative presentation methods he uses to display work in his gallery.

    Some good ideas there, if you're not wedded to the idea of traditional frames and mats.
    Michael Sebastian
    Website | Blog

  6. #6
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    Last time I suggested swapping, I got slapped.

  7. #7
    MikeSeb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBrunner View Post
    Last time I suggested swapping, I got slapped.
    Perhaps you didn't frame the question correctly?
    Michael Sebastian
    Website | Blog

  8. #8
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    My problem is that my work is now "odd sized" (15"x22" or 22"x30") and doesn't look right in US standard sized frames. It looks like I'm going to need to have custom frames made, but IDK. Since these are "standard" sizes for watercolor I keep thinking there would be some off the shelf solution. If there is, I haven't found it. If I frame them, I'll float mount them, which would make it easy to change them out. Popping the backing board out of metal or wood frames is pretty easy, as long as you don't tab or click them in with harware like you mean to keep it in there forever. I'm thinking a pretty stiff backing board so not so many clips/tabs are needed, maybe four or six...

  9. #9
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    What about the eight or ten spring clips that hold the backing board against the glass? Those are a PITA to remove.

    Here at work, where we display some of the brand names that the company I work for owns, we have some frames that are permanently fixed to the wall. They are 20x24 and the whole front of them swing open. Take the whole 'assembly' with backing board, print mount, and overmat, slip it in and close it back up again.

    Don't know where to get them, but some research would help.

    The disadvantage is - once they're up, they're up. You can't rotate them or anything. You'd be advantaged by printing square images, I guess.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nige View Post
    I use this sort of frame and they are very easy to open. 2 screws is all that need loosening to open them.

    EDIT : yeah, what Ann said
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  10. #10
    ann
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    well, the use of 8 to 10 spring clips is a bit much unless it is a very large piece.

    a simple twist with a screw drive removes the clip. We tend to use one clip on each rail up to 16x20 more for bigger.
    http://www.aclancyphotography.com

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