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  1. #11
    Kvistgaard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    This is very interesting. I really don't have room for a dry-mount press (although the school might have one I can use), but I do have an iron. For smallish prints, if I could lay a tshirt over them drymount them using an iron that would be great. I need to get some of that tissue and do some experimenting.
    Bettersense, I forgot to add that I usually stick a piece of paper between the iron and the print, just to make sure I don't scratch the latter.
    S°ren

    "We are much more likely to act our way into a new way of thinking than think our way into a new way of acting." - R. Pascale

  2. #12
    fdi
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    Although I am not a conservator, here is my two cents as a framer. In general 3M super 77 is considered a good adhesive for inexpensive decorative mounting. For the most part framers will avoid it because it is not as permanent or as conservative as other methods they have. It is not considered reversible like t-hinging and unlike methods such as dry mounting; it is more likely to fail with bubbles or peeling over time. There are two keys to adhesive mounting. One is getting rid of all the air. The second is making sure the adhesive is evenly spread and fully activated. If you are careful, this can be done fairly well by hand on small prints. As the prints get larger it becomes much more difficult. That is when the advantages of a press for dry mounting or roller equipment for pressure activated adhesives come in to play. In the end you have to consider what is being done with the print. If it is a 40x60 print being adhered to gatorboard super 77 wont work. If it is an 8x10 print being sold at low cost and not expected to be passed down through the generations then super 77 will be just fine.

  3. #13

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    This may not be appropriate for your needs, but honestly, I just use 3M Photo & Document tape to mount my prints. Works very well for my hobby needs, mainly attaching photos to the inside pages of archival books (the ones with acid free black pages).

    I tried the 3M Photo Mount spray years ago, and made the mistake of using it indoors on a project (mounting photos in an archival book of my honeymoon to Hawaii). After just one evening of using that, I had a headache that, I am not exaggerating, did not go away for several _days_. I threw the can away and have never touched the stuff since - it is extremely toxic, and like others have said, should never, ever be used indoors. I'm really surprised it's still on the market, to be quite honest.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by guyjr View Post
    I tried the 3M Photo Mount spray years ago, and made the mistake of using it indoors on a project (mounting photos in an archival book of my honeymoon to Hawaii). After just one evening of using that, I had a headache that, I am not exaggerating, did not go away for several _days_. I threw the can away and have never touched the stuff since - it is extremely toxic, and like others have said, should never, ever be used indoors. I'm really surprised it's still on the market, to be quite honest.
    I'm not trying to cause offence here, but the can does state that it should be used in a well-ventilated area - I can't see why a product should be taken off the market because people ignore directions!

    I have an outside area which I go to when using the spray - which is fine unless it's too windy

  5. #15

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    I have a dry mounting press and have essentially stopped dry mounting prints (fiber base paper) and use the press now to flatten prints which I mount with archival corners because if the mat board gets damaged or develops climate stains in a high humidity climate such as we have in Florida there goes the print.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffreyg View Post
    I have a dry mounting press and have essentially stopped dry mounting prints (fiber base paper) and use the press now to flatten prints which I mount with archival corners because if the mat board gets damaged or develops climate stains in a high humidity climate such as we have in Florida there goes the print.
    I don't understand. Do you glue the overmat to the mount-board?
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  7. #17

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    No, I don't use any glues. If the print is framed I use archival backing plus the mount board and then an over mat. If the print is to be framed by the recipient I just use the mount board and let the framer do the rest (with my recommendations). An eight ply over mat has a great look but should be done with a computer guided mat cutter. We have a local frame shop that is very knowledgeable about handling photographs and has all the correct equipment and frames for museums etc.. Also I do platinum/palladium and it is not recommended to dry mount those.
    Jeff

  8. #18
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    Thanks for the clarification. I understand now, it was my confusion about the terms 'mount-board' and 'mat-board'. To me, mount-board is the board the print is mounted to, and mat-board is the board I cut the overmat from. They can, but they don't have to be, out of the same material.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  9. #19

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    Adhesive Transfer Sheets?

    I've not seen one mention of Adhesive Transfer Sheets.
    Via Google I see there are many suppliers and some
    mention has been made of them on other threads.

    The sheets have adhesive both sides. I'd think it
    very tricky to use them. Any with experience?
    I like the idea of a cool application that can
    be easily stowed out of the way when not
    mounting. Dan

  10. #20
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu View Post
    I've not seen one mention of Adhesive Transfer Sheets.
    Via Google I see there are many suppliers and some
    mention has been made of them on other threads.

    The sheets have adhesive both sides. I'd think it
    very tricky to use them. Any with experience?
    I like the idea of a cool application that can
    be easily stowed out of the way when not
    mounting. Dan
    Is there any archival self-adhesive?
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

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