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  1. #1
    Sean's Avatar
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    I used to tack on the tissue, then use a steel ruler and an xacto knife to trim, then line up and press. Is there a more easy way to do this? I was looking at those rotary cutters but they don't seem to hold the print firmly in place. What works best for you? thanks!

  2. #2

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    Sean,

    I use the rotary type cutter.

  3. #3
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    I use the ruler / exacto knife. usually works pretty good. My experience with the roto trimmers is from working in community college darkrooms. The blades were dull, so it was hard to cut, and I had problems lining the print up straight with them. The ruler is more "visual" for me.
    hi!

  4. #4

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    I use the rotary type.

  5. #5

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    I use ruler + exacto; but have problem keeping print square - when matting wider than print for signature space. Any suggestions?
    van Huyck Photo
    "Progress is only a direction, and it's often the wrong direction"

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by doughowk
    I use ruler + exacto; but have problem keeping print square - when matting wider than print for signature space. Any suggestions?
    doug, that's eaxctly what I want to start doing and fear I'll run into the same problems...

  7. #7

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    I think that there are rotary cutters, and then there are rotary cutters. I think you want a Rotatrim with the two guide bars. The model is the Mastercut II.

  8. #8

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    I use a ruler and X-Acto. I buy a dispenser that holds 50 blades, and change every other print or so.

    I too like the "floating mount", where there is space between the outer edge of the print and the inner edge of the window mat, with extra space at the bottom for a signature.

    Here's what I've come up with. A standard 11x14 mat for 8x10 artwork has a window that is 7-1/2" x 9-1/2". For a floating mount, I leave 1/4" around the two sides and the top, and 3/8" at the bottom, for the signature. For 11x14 prints, I add 1/8" to all sides, but that's just me.

    So, I had a window mat cut with an opening that is 7" x 8-7/8", and the opening is 1/8" above center in the vertical plane. I use this mat to overlay the print and mark it for trimming. Then, I put this mat on top of an 11x14 mount board, line them up and fasten them together with clips. I can then drop the trimmed print and mounting tissue into the opening, put a shot bag on it, and tack it down.

    Seems to work pretty well.
    "If You Push Something Hard Enough, It Will fall over" - Fudd's First Law of Opposition

  9. #9
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    I picked up a great little rotary made by Carl a couple of months ago. Metal base, holds the paper securely flat while cutting and was very inexpensive. The drawback? It only cuts up to 12". It works wonderfully for my 8x10s and cutting test strips in the darkroom but that's about it. Apparently there are 15" and 18" versions and also other models but I haven't tried them.

    WARNING! My last rotary was an X acto with a plastic base. It was awful. It didn't flatten the paper under the blade very well and the base tended to flex under pressure and cause the cuts to vary. Mercifully, the thing fell apart within a year of light use and I was able to do to it what I should have done to it as soon as I brought it home. It would have saved me some aggravation.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  10. #10
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    I use my mat cutter to trim the prints. It usually has a fresh blade and holds the paper down quite well. I have a Logan 650 with the twin rails to guide the cutter.
    Gary Beasley

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