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  1. #1

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    Bonding film to glass

    I would like to bond ('glue') film (preferably the emulsion side) to glass in an archival and permanent way. The bonding material must be optically clear (invisible) and in no way interfere with viewing the image on the film when seen through the glass and bond.

    Does anyone have professional experience with this or insight into how this could be done?

    Stefan

  2. #2
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Try Balsam cement as used for Microscope slides & pre-70's Optical elements in lenses.

    I did many hundred microscope slides but not glass to film or glass to glass yet

    Ian

  3. #3
    richard ide's Avatar
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    For what purpose do you wish to do this? I have mounted various photo materials to clear acrylic using both a clear double coated adhesive film and silicone adhesive. Canada Balsam is a good idea but my only reservation would be that the layer may be thicker than used in microscopy or cementing lenses and as the essential oil evaporates, might allow air bubbles to form.
    Richard

    Why are there no speaker jacks on a stereo camera?

  4. #4

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    Ian and Richard, thank you for replying. The purpose is to give more flatness and stability to the film I use, which is an Arista orthochromatic film, and thinner than standard camera film. I am printing on this film to make orotones, i.e. the other side is surfaced with gold (using gilder's oil as bonding medium). For handling and framing it would be good to bond the film to glass. I have not been succesful coating emulsions to glass, nor am I aware of coatable orthochromatic emulsions, so printing on Arista has been a good alternative so far. Maybe too, I could use that same gilder's oil to bond the film to glass. I didn't try that yet. I am not really aware of what Canada Balsam is and have to look into that.
    Thanks again.
    Stefan

  5. #5
    richard ide's Avatar
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    Would it be possible to just sandwich the film between two sheets of glass and apply the gold leaf and size to the inside surface of the back sheet of glass or the back of the film. When I was mounting film and paper, I had a very expensive learning curve.
    Richard

    Why are there no speaker jacks on a stereo camera?

  6. #6

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    I thought of that, but wonder about the archival aspects like humidity getting into the sandwich and possibly Newton rings forming.
    The more I read about Canada balsam the more curious I get, and wonder if I can use it to also bond the gold to the film. I will be in Germany over the Holidays and want to approach the gold leaf company where I get my supplies and get their thoughts on this.
    I wonder where I can find out about the PH of Canada Balsam and the Gold Leaf sizing.
    Thanks guys,
    Stefan

  7. #7
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    How about preheating the glass and then pressing the film onto it while warm enough to cause the gelatin to semi 'melt' (?) and thus bond to the glass? Never done it but to the unknowing it kinda makes sense. I would try it anyway to see if it worked.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
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  8. #8

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    Yes, mh, maybe. And you're giving me an idea, like pressing the film onto glass while the gelatin is still wet. With the glass preheated.

  9. #9
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    Can't risk chemical reactions from the one direction, work something out the other way, huh? Let us know what you get going. Might wanna try a variant myself.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
    APUG BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE
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    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  10. #10
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    I would think there would be a UV-cured adhesive like what is used to cement lens elements that would work. These adhesives are also used in auto glass. They are optically clear and completely repositionable until they are cured with UV light, but I don't know how they would bond with or interact with film.

    Ron Mowrey's Azo-like silver chloride emulsion is available now from Photographer's Formulary, and I believe it will bond to glass that has been subbed with gelatin--

    http://www.photoformulary.com/Deskto...uid%20emulsion
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

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