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  1. #11
    fdi
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    Mac, I am afraid I don’t have a recommendation on what is too small. I have seen people put 4x6 prints in 11x14 frames with a large bottom weight. I can say that if you want to buy frame materials, quantity discounts can save a lot of money, especially on precut mats, and as someone else mentioned, makes stocking easier. Black frames with white mats is the most common, safest and easiest way to display photography and I would recommend starting there. Once you figure out the proportions you like, you can later experiment with other types of moulding and mat colors but in general that will increase your cost, complexity and stocking issues. For the mat borders I would play with the online tool that was mentioned and then get some white poster board and cut a hole in the appropriate size for you image with the borders you like. You can then see a live example with your image in it.

    Cheers,
    Mark

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by jovo View Post
    This site is infinitely useful:


    http://www.russellcottrell.com/photo/centering.htm


    You can experiment with any dimension of mat and opening you can think of using the program at the bottom of the page. I have saved endless amounts of time previewing what my work will look like using this resource.
    I have been using this technique for vertical centering for a few years now. It does not work in some cases, but it works in most. Very useful technique!
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    I have been using this technique for vertical centering for a few years now. It does not work in some cases, but it works in most. Very useful technique!

    Actually, that's true for me as well. Sometimes I tweak a recommended dimension in its' context a bit and am happy with the result. What it does supremely well is to assess what looks good in the most affordable materials you can find that are dimensioned to standard sizes. If I could afford to purchase custom frame sizes I'd use it as well, but allow myself creative latitude to find yet better dimensions and ratios for them.
    John Voss

    My Blog

  4. #14

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    No Window

    I wonder if overlay mats, window mats, are no more
    than an in vogue treatment for mounting prints. I do
    see now and then photos which are framed but
    show no window.

    Cutting a big hole in a premium grade cardboard
    in order to do justice to a print seems to me to
    be in the nature of a cosmetic distraction.

    I may skip the logan 700-S. I've wood and metal
    working experience and moulding of both is
    abundant. Skip the Window?? Dan

  5. #15
    fdi
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    There are no hard rules, and matting is of course is not mandatory, but mats can provide some other functions:
    1. Keep the print off the glass which will ruin it. As an alternative, you can use spacers for this.
    2. Asthetically provide some distance between the moulding and the print so that the moulding does not detract from the print.
    3. When using color mats, they can be used to help make certain colors in the print “pop” (not much good for B&W)
    4. Provide a buffer between the wood moulding (which is acidic) and the print. There are sealer tapes which help protect the print from the moulding.

    Cheers,
    Mark

    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu View Post
    I wonder if overlay mats, window mats, are no more
    than an in vogue treatment for mounting prints. I do
    see now and then photos which are framed but
    show no window.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu View Post
    I wonder if overlay mats, window mats, are no more
    than an in vogue treatment for mounting prints. I do
    see now and then photos which are framed but
    show no window.

    Cutting a big hole in a premium grade cardboard
    in order to do justice to a print seems to me to
    be in the nature of a cosmetic distraction.

    I may skip the logan 700-S. I've wood and metal
    working experience and moulding of both is
    abundant. Skip the Window?? Dan
    Check out Jefferson Hayman's work. He uses antique (one of a kind), and "artist" made ( he's made them himself) frames for the bulk of his photographs that are very well received in many galleries and several countries. He uses minimal mats and spacers to keep the print off the glass.

    http://www.jeffersonhayman.com/
    John Voss

    My Blog

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