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  1. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mahler_one View Post
    Merg: Where did you get the roller?



    Ed
    Ed, I have had it for so many years that I do no recall the origin. It is a 12" hard rubber roller on a cast frame. My guess is that I purchased it from a photographic or graphic arts supplier; the photo use was most likely to roll prints onto ferrotype plates.

    I would suggest a search of brayers to find something similar. However, any similar rolling device should work if you use a cover mat over the print while rolling. The trick, as John found, is to apply strong pressure over the print during the cooling process.

    If you wish, you can listen to conservators about the downside of drymounting prints. In my opinion, it is the best presentation for a photographic image, and those drymounted by Edward Weston 80 years ago have sold for over a million dollars.

  2. #32

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    Thanks very much Merg. How about a wooden roller over the cover mat?? Merg-once again, and sorry to be repetitious-what is the temperature that you "need" to reach ( and for how long ) in order to assure a tight bound with the mounting paper? An issue was raised concerning different "kinds" of such paper, i.e., color-mount vs. "standard" mounting paper. Which do you recommend?

    Ed

  3. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mahler_one View Post
    Thanks very much Merg. How about a wooden roller over the cover mat?? Merg-once again, and sorry to be repetitious-what is the temperature that you "need" to reach ( and for how long ) in order to assure a tight bound with the mounting paper? An issue was raised concerning different "kinds" of such paper, i.e., color-mount vs. "standard" mounting paper. Which do you recommend?

    Ed
    Wooden roller should work, use a two ply cover mat. Press temperature set at 225 degrees with two ply board over print, 1 1/2 minutes press time, Beinfang BufferMount tissue. Roll immediately upon removing print from press for about 30 seconds during cooling stage.

  4. #34

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    To Mahler one - I no longer dry mount gallery prints, but when I did I made sure the room was not humid, pre-heated the print and the board (one at a time) just prior to mounting, and placed under aluminum plates immediately after mounting. I made sure I left in the press the right amount of time, no more (I was told that if the board gets too hot, it stays hot after removing from the press and it can buckle for that reason), no less, for the final mount (25 seconds for me, MT-5 at 210F).
    I never ever had a print buckle, and have many today (that were mounted in the late 70s through the 90s) that are still flat.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Merg Ross View Post
    I do believe that adhesion at the cooling stage may be the problem. Rolling gives better adhesion than weight alone. ... Let us know what you discover.
    I've finally found the ideal roller for cooling stage adhesion. I went to Home Despot and looked in the paint roller aisle, and there it was - a cast aluminum, adjustable length paint roller with roller retaining arms on both sides. Using a fairly dense paint applicator roller, the thing does the job without any risk of pressure lines on the print as it's adjustable to 18 inches which perfect for 11x14 or 16x20 prints because it's larger than they are. The actual print roller is softer than hard rubber, and is extremely gentle to the print surface. Also, if it gets dirty or absorbs anything abrasive, just toss it, and buy another. Because it has retaining arms on both sides there is even pressure throughout. So...bingo! I'm happy at last!
    John Voss

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  6. #36
    fdi
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    For proper dry mounting, there are 4 critical factors that you have to control:
    1. Time
    2. Temperature
    3. Pressure
    4. Moisture

    After the mounting is performed, the cool down is also a critical aspect especially for removable tissues that bond as they cool. An ideal cool down press can be created with a 1/4 thick tempered plate glass and a wooden workbench. Screw a piece of 1x2” wood to the back surface of the bench to keep the glass from sliding off the back. Position the wood strip so that the front of the glass protrudes off the front of the bench by about 1 inch so you can easily lift the glass with your hands.

    Cheers,
    Mark

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