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  1. #21

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    Thanks gentlemen. I am on the case.
    Francesco

  2. #22

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    Found transformers here in Stockholm that handle conversion of US voltage and frequency (115 and 60) into Swedish voltage and frequency (230 and 50). Thanks for all the help everyone.

  3. #23
    edz
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    Quote Originally Posted by Francesco
    Finally, I believe I will need a transformer of some kind so that I can use it here in Sweden. Anyone in Europe have one of these that they use with a transformer? Which transformer do you suggest?
    The Seal press is a simple heating unit. The thermostat is, I suspect, a simple bi-metal affair. The thermometer is non-electrical--- a mechanical dial-type. Should there be a timer it too is mechanical and nothing much more than a wind-up.
    Edward C. Zimmermann
    BSn R&D // http://www.nonmonotonic.net

  4. #24
    noseoil's Avatar
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    Francesco, I have the same basic press and it was built to last. Mine had a few wires which were not making proper contact after many years. If yours is slow to heat up, remove the cover with the lamps under it, tighten all connections and look closely at the terminal ends on the wires. I ended up replacing the on-off switch with a hardware store type as mine wasn't working well after too many years. With the new switch and tight connections it works like a champ now. Heats fast, presses nice & flat.

    I was fortunate to get one with a clean pad and platten. I don't use a slip sheet with mine or mat boards, so 15 seconds is sufficient to have a good bond. The extra mat boards are a good way to prevent problems with dust, dirt and contamination. I just used a kitchen type meat thermometer to set the correct heat on the press and I leave it alone (190f).

    How much was the transformer you had to buy and what was the power rating in watts?

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Francesco
    Found transformers here in Stockholm that handle conversion of US voltage and frequency (115 and 60) into Swedish voltage and frequency (230 and 50). Thanks for all the help everyone.
    Francesco, There is more to consider then whether the transformer will convert the voltages as required. There is also the electrical wattage to be considered. A transformer of too small wattage capacity will simply overheat and fail.

    Typically the wattage (as designated by the manufacturer) must be converted to the quantity of amperes that it will require. This is accomplished by dividing the wattage of your press by the voltage (American voltage) and this will give you the amperes the device will draw in American voltage. For instance if the wattage of the press were 1400 watts this would be divided by 115 volts and the result would be 12.17 amperes. This is necessary to know in order to properly size the transformer. Next the amperes are multiplied by voltage to arrive at the volt/amperes (VA) size of the transformer.

    Additionally what you will need is a "step down" transformer that would be to take your voltage in Sweden into the drymount press voltage. Not the other way around as you stated it. They do make both "step up" and "step down" transformers and it is important to know which you will be using.

    Insofar as the conversion of 50 hertz (cycle) supply that you have into 60 hertz (cycle) that the press designates, that should not be necessary since this is a resistance electrical device. The only time that a conversion of this type would be required is when an inductive load is being fed. This would be an electrical motor (for example).

    Good luck.

  6. #26

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    Gentlemen, I chickened out on getting the old Seal press to work and have purchased a new one (http://geoknight.com/jp.html). I picked up the JP14 and it works like a dream. A transformer that could handle such wattage for the Seal press cost more than purchasing the JP14 and shipping it over to Sweden. Many thanks for helping me see the light!
    Francesco

  7. #27
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    I know you have settled this now, but for any one in a similar position in future: a cheap solution for 220V -> 110V conversion is to use one of the industrial transformers used on building sites (at least in the UK - not sure about other european countries or the antipodes etc). For safety, professional power tools are 110V and use a sealed transformer - usually orange - to step the voltage down.

    Used ones can be had fairly cheaply in the shops or on auction sites - they are about 55 quid new for a 3kW unit in the UK. You will need a special plug to fit the socket on the transformer housing (readily available). Very robust and safe (overload protected & splash-proof).

    Cheers,

  8. #28

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    Purchased Seal 150

    Quote Originally Posted by lee
    It would be my recommendation to use two 4 ply mat boards in the press. My pressed are not the cleanest in the world as they are both pretty old. I use the aforementioned mat boards and sandwich the print for flattening between the boards. I use the same method for dry mounting. I prefer not to use the release paper. I have never used it in 25 years and don't plan on starting at this late date.

    lee\c
    Hi,
    I just received my Seal 150. In good shape except the pad is dented and pretty old and crispy in places. I like the matboard idea. The pad measures 15 1/2 x 19 x 1". The pads I find online for the 160 are a different size. Is there a material I can use to make my own replacement pad?
    Any help is appreciated.
    Thanks,
    Sherril

  9. #29
    BarrieB's Avatar
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    With the SEAL press the top part (with the heating element in it ) swings down to the base ( with that felt spacing ) to give the Print, tissue and mounting board sufficient pressure to bond the print with heat and pressure. You may replace the felt but the swing should be re-adjusted to give the correct tension. When I dry-mount with my Seal press I have a large piece of Photo background paper folded in two in which I place my Print. From top to bottom I have :- Background paper, mat board or release tissue, then print, tissue , backing board (all 3 tackked together ) then another backing board then the other piece of that background paper. It is all assembled , put in place in the press , the press closed down for 60 seconds, removed, then the print placed under a large piece of 1/2" glass until it cools, usually this is in time for the next print to be cooled. Using this method the emulsion face of my prints only come in contact with either my release paper or the clean piece of matt board.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Francesco
    Gentlemen, I chickened out on getting the old Seal press to work and have purchased a new one (http://geoknight.com/jp.html). I picked up the JP14 and it works like a dream. A transformer that could handle such wattage for the Seal press cost more than purchasing the JP14 and shipping it over to Sweden. Many thanks for helping me see the light!
    Francesco,
    Are you able to press 11x14 prints in this press with no problems around the edges? I looked on the site you mentioned and it only had a 12 by 14 inch surface.
    Diane

    Halak 41

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