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  1. #31
    Anscojohn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    I agree entirely with the above.


    Steve.
    ************
    Ditto.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  2. #32
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    You can lead a horse to water but you can't make him drink.
    and
    You can lead a student to knowledge but you can't make him think.

    Those who can, do.
    Those who can't, teach.
    Those who can't teach, teach others to teach.

    Steve
    I always thought it was "those who can't teach, teach gym".

    And then there's the old Dorothy Parker quote, when at the Ladies' Garden Club meeting and asked to use 'horticulture' in a sentence:

    You can lead a horticulture but you can't make her think

    I'll put in another vote for communications skills being THE most important thing you can learn from a 4-year degree. Although sometimes it can seem counterproductive - I got my degree in English Literature from a prestige university, but I ended up going into a very different field - I didn't end up in academia, but rather in Information Technology. However, the writing and communication skills are paying off because they will be what enables me to de-shackle myself from the technology grind and move into a decision-making and leadership role.

  3. #33

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    Employers sometimes use degree attainment as a screening device. In other words, it may be less what you learned than the fact that you stuck with it for 4 years and got your degree. Not an issue for a self employed photographer but nice to have in your back pocket.

    I'll add my vote for verbal and written communication skills. I did a fair amount of interviewing of recent college grads. Much of my "thumbs up / thumbs down" decision was based on how well the candidate could communicate clearly.

    I remember complaining, when I was an undergraduate, about general education requirements that had no direct bearing on my major. I now know how wrong I was about the value of these requirements.
    "Far more critical than what we know or do not know is what we do not want to know." - Eric Hoffer

  4. #34
    mooseontheloose's Avatar
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    Those who can, do.
    Those who can't, teach.
    Those who can't teach, teach others to teach.


    As a teacher, I've never been fond of this quote.
    Rachelle

    My favorite thing is to go where I've never been. D. Arbus

  5. #35
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    Get whatever DSLR is popular now, and a copy of whatever editing software is popular now. Find out what the competition is charging for weddings, graduations, and so on, and put lots of ads on Craigslist for slightly less. Make sure you advertise that you will be taking lots of pictures...people want to feel like they are getting a lot for their money. Also get a good desk chair so that you can sit for hours shopping out relatives (at no extra charge). You will definitely want to invest in HDR software and probably a lensbaby so that you can make your pictures look fuzzy and therefore professional.
    f/22 and be there.

  6. #36
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mooseontheloose View Post
    Those who can, do.
    Those who can't, teach.
    Those who can't teach, teach others to teach.


    As a teacher, I've never been fond of this quote.
    As a professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science for a decade, I just can't imagine why you do not have a fondness for this quotations. <<insert smile here>>

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  7. #37
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fotch View Post
    A college degree today is almost like a high school degree was 40 years ago. Just think, 40 years from now, for any some reason, any reason, you need to get a job. What do you find? Hard times, that's what. In economic times like today, even the person with a degree and a steady work record has difficulties. The person, now older, with no degree, well its a double whammy. You start thinking about working where you use to shop, Wallys world. Get the degree and pursue what ever else you want. Besides, you may actully learn something that may help you latter on. JMHO

    I do not know what fields of knowlege you deal with but my experience in the realm of engineering, physics and math are similar to:
    Quote Originally Posted by mgb74 View Post
    Employers sometimes use degree attainment as a screening device. In other words, it may be less what you learned than the fact that you stuck with it for 4 years and got your degree. Not an issue for a self employed photographer but nice to have in your back pocket.

    I'll add my vote for verbal and written communication skills. I did a fair amount of interviewing of recent college grads. Much of my "thumbs up / thumbs down" decision was based on how well the candidate could communicate clearly.

    I remember complaining, when I was an undergraduate, about general education requirements that had no direct bearing on my major. I now know how wrong I was about the value of these requirements.
    It is during the screening that I find out if the computer science major can handle the first principles of physics or only ones, zeros and compiliers. If a candidate cannot deal with free space, first principles of physics and mathematical theory then, if I hire the candidate, I either have to teach him or her these subjects or I have to spoon feel the algorithms so that the work can be done. Sometimes I just pass on the candidate because I do not need the extra work.

    Yes, degrees matter and so does the ability to write clearly.

    Stev
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  8. #38
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    So true. Another important quality is loving to learn new things and learning them fast. A degree that's some what related to English Literature degree is a Liberal Arts degree. I think a broad based education is more important that an education that is narrowly focused only in one area. A lot of knowledge in technical areas taught in college is outdated before the student gets his or her degree. Especially in the area of computers and technology. Another important skill is being adaptable to what ever comes along. A lot of college students are studying for new jobs that haven't been created yet. It's great that st3ve wants to be a photographer, but he'll probably have to adapt to new markets, technologies and new styles of photography that comes along. I wish him luck.

  9. #39

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    going to a university / college / technical school as an older student
    isn't a bad idea. the 18y/o could assist a well known professional
    to learn lighting and shooting techniques
    or work in a portrait factory and learn how to pose and talk with
    customers and then after he / she feels ready start to do their own thing.
    then, when s/he realizes the whole business of photography is who you know
    and connections ( and having a drop dead portfolio )
    he / she might decide to go to a school and study something
    that they are interested in as a "fall back career",.
    he / she do photography on the side for friends and maybe the school
    ( since he / she already has experience in it ) while studying, to earn some cash
    and hone his / her skills even more, and maybe put their interest of photography to use in whatever else they have an interest in.

  10. #40
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mooseontheloose View Post
    Those who can, do.
    Those who can't, teach.
    Those who can't teach, teach others to teach.


    As a teacher, I've never been fond of this quote.
    I prefer:

    Those who can, do
    Those who understand, teach
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

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