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  1. #11

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    Sage --

    Yes, I make all of my own frames. I don't use 2x4's, I buy 3/4" poplar boards and cut them into long strips of frame stock on a table saw. I also cut out the rabbet on the table saw, and then use a mitre guage set at 45 degrees to cross cut the stock strips into the four pieces for the frame. I know that the pro framers use the monstrous chopper things, but I much prefer a table saw with a fine, sharp carbide blade.

    I then assemble the four pieces of the frame by using a 4 cornered framing clamp, which consists of 4 metal corners that are threaded to accept long pieces of all-thread with wing nuts on the other end to draw the clamp closed around the frame. The frame is assembled only with glue, with no nails, pins, or cleats from behind. After years of doing this, my frames when finished have virtually seamless mitre joints.

    I sometimes leave my frames natural, but mostly now I dye them black before applying several light coats of laquer. I cut all my own glass and mats as well.

    Best Regards,

    Dave

  2. #12
    fdi
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    Dave, that is interesting that you are really making your own wood frames, even more than a custom frame shop does. I own a frame company and canít imagine actually making the frame moulding without tripling our prices.

    I know a few framers that still use the old chopper but those donít work for metal so a lot of framers use saws. We use dedicated pneumatic double mitre saws. They have a pair of carbide tipped blades calibrated and locked at opposing 45 degree angles. They have air clamps that hold the moulding and a foot peddle causes air to drive the blades down for the cutting action at an adjustable speed.

    Glue is the best thing for joining the frames and when done correctly if you stress the frame it will not break at the join where the glue is. It will break in a different part. We use v-nails but their main purpose is the hold the wood frame together while the glue dries. You canít do picture frames by the hundreds when you have to leave them in the clamps to dry. Our v-nailer is computerized and also uses pneumatic clamps. You just press the foot peddle and it grabs the moulding and starts shooting nails in at pre-programmed depths and locations. It basically sounds like a machine gun.

    Cheers,
    Mark

  3. #13
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    If you use frames from Michael's, you will probably need to buy a point driver rather than use the tabs on the backing board that comes with the frame, because they presume a certain thickness that isn't typical of an actual mat-window overmat arrangement. I've found some really excellent wide, mahogany dyed, glass front frames that are perfect for the thiocarbamide toned prints that I currently am making, but they'd be useless if I couldn't drive my own mounting points.

    Also, check out Jefferson Hayman's work. He uses antique, and "artist made" frames generally without overmats at all. His work is in some of the most important collections on the planet and is in some very prominent galleries. It's a very different direction from what we typically do, but it's brilliant, and successful.

    www.jeffersonhayman.com
    John Voss

    My Blog

  4. #14

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    i buy my mats at www.redimat.com always pleased with them.

  5. #15
    fdi
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    FlashThat, what is the substrate of your matboard composed of? It says on your website "direct from the manufacturer". I was curious who the manufacturer was?

    Cheers,
    Mark

    Quote Originally Posted by FlashThat View Post
    Just to keep your shopping options open, check out BDmatboard! You will find pre cut mats, full sheet matboards, frameless frames, presentation mount boards. All low priced material great for getting creative on your own and framing your photography!

  6. #16
    Jim Jones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sage View Post
    Has anyone here actually built the frames themselves, as such just grabbing some 2x4's and routing and joining it together or some such to describe how thats done?
    I have, but rarely, and only for paintings. Making a frame from raw material can be more time-consuming than doing the artwork. That might be appropriate for home decorators, but not if the art is more important than the frame.

    For photograps, I rely on aluminum section frames from www.framefit.com/. Their frames are good, and their service is great.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Jones View Post
    ... Making a frame from raw material can be more time-consuming than doing the artwork. That might be appropriate for home decorators, but not if the art is more important than the frame.
    Actually, as Peter says on his site (he's a friend of mine), the frame is, or can be, an essential part of the art piece. Like my friend Jefferson whose site I linked above, Peter takes the time to make very beautiful frames that are integral to the presentation of the photographs. If you're not presenting your work in a book, but rather you intend them to be seen on a wall, make the entire "package" as attractive as you can.

    Here's his site: http://www.peterliepke.com/index.cfm
    John Voss

    My Blog

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