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  1. #1

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    framing photos with or without glass

    hi there,
    I'm preparing a show of some photos, 30 x 40cm, and find that frames with glass can be disastrous because of the reflexions. But without glass the prints are vulnerable, of course. How do you present your prints?
    peter

  2. #2

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    Go with glass. If the lighting is correct reflections should not be a problem.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

  3. #3

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    I've noticed that a lot of galleries wont accept glass, but prefer or require plexie. Its lighter and sometimes cheaper, but it will scratch if you even look at it too hard.
    All the best
    M. David Farrell, Jr.

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  4. #4
    johnnywalker's Avatar
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    I don't use glass or anything else to frame my pictures because of the reflections, but I've never shown them in a gallery. I'm curious as to what vulnerabilities you think they might have aside from sunlight and UV, neither of which should be a problem in a gallery.
    If I had been present at the creation, I would have given some useful hints for the better arrangement of the Universe.
    Alfonso the Wise, 1221-1284

  5. #5
    fdi
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    Short term you also have to worry about finger prints. Long term you have to worry about atmospheric contaminants. No glazing at all is the least expensive option and no glazing reflections but if you are using a gloss or semi-gloss paper then you will still have print reflections.

    My favorite choice is regular acrylic with proper gallery lighting. Acrylic wont break during transport and it does not have a green tint. With proper lighting there are little reflections. The light should be above the image shining down so that reflection is only sean if you sit in chair so that your eyes are below the image looking up. This page has photos of images that framed with acrylic except for the canvas floaters: Picture Frame Gallery. In this case it is studio lighting with lights on both sides of the picture frame so there are no reflections when viewing the picture straight on.

    The next least expensive option is non-glare acrylic or non-glare glass. These products have an etched surface to reduce reflections. The drawback is that they will also slightly reduce sharpness. Poor quality versions of this product will give the image a matted look which I consider completely unacceptable. High quality versions are difficult to notice the difference in sharpness unless you do an A/B test.

    The last option is anti-glare acrylic or glass such as TruVue Musuem glass. The drawback with this product is that it is very expensive and will probably cost more than all the other framing components combined.


    Quote Originally Posted by johnnywalker View Post
    I don't use glass or anything else to frame my pictures because of the reflections, but I've never shown them in a gallery. I'm curious as to what vulnerabilities you think they might have aside from sunlight and UV, neither of which should be a problem in a gallery.

  6. #6

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    If you are presenting glossy prints you will have the same problem with or without glass, but glass will protect the prints. I would try to work with the gallery and try to either adjust the placement of the prints or the lighting for maximum effect. You know you could also use the reflections off the glass to your advantage and set the photos on the wall in a way that allows you to only view one at a time so that your presentation of your are becomes part of the art and you draw people in by forcing them to stand in the place you want them in order to view the photo.
    "Would you like it if someone that painted in oils told you that you were not making portraits because you were using a camera?"
    "Shouldn't it be more about the joy of producing and viewing the photo than what you paid for the camera?"

    Me

  7. #7

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    I have exactly the same quandary :once you have spent fabulous sums on the print,toning,mounting etc,etc ,equally fabulous amounts on glass/plexi,at the end of which a less-than perfect light placement can destroy your visual effect and make a lovely image unremarkable to the viewer.
    Stuff that : I am going to buff my prints with Renaissance Wax,present them unglassed,and let the buyer take the weight for any subsequent glazing/framing they may feel is needed.

  8. #8

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    thanks for your comments. I've now hung thirty photos in a gallery, most of them without glass but it is true when the paper is glossy that gives same reflexions as glass. However, a few of them are printed on mat paper and that is THE solution. I'll do that in the future
    peter

  9. #9

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    The Columbia Museum of Art, in Columbia, SC, didn't do a good job of lighting the AA show they hosted this year. They were underlit and really required the viewer to strain to pick up on all the nuances of the prints. Lighting is crucial.
    M. David Farrell, Jr.

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    ~Buying a Nikon doesn not make you a photographer. It makes you a Nikon owner!

    ~Everybody has a photographic memory, but not everybody has film!

  10. #10
    Jim Fitzgerald's Avatar
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    I present all of my carbon prints without any glazing at all. Even non glare kills the image,IMHO.

    Jim

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