Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,302   Posts: 1,536,190   Online: 696
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 27
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    828
    Images
    131
    Ha ha. Completely unrealistic video. Workspace is far too organized, clean and uncluttered to accomplish anything.

    Other than that, I wish I could have seen this years ago.

    Perhaps it is because of the high humidity here in the PNW, but I find it necessary to drive off the humidity with a ten second press, before re-inserting it to completely drymount. Otherwise, the emulsion can bond to the top mat board.

    Good stuff, Ben. Thank you for putting it together.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Brandon, Manitoba Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    323
    Pros & cons of using foam board as a backing for dry mounting a print?

  3. #13
    Greg Davis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Crestview Hills, KY
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    1,909
    Quote Originally Posted by walbergb View Post
    Pros & cons of using foam board as a backing for dry mounting a print?
    The foam melts in the heat press. Use archival quality mounting board.
    www.gregorytdavis.com

    Did millions of people suddenly disappear? This may have an answer.

    "No one knows that day or hour, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father." -Matthew 24:36

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Brandon, Manitoba Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    323
    Yes, I have experienced the foam board melting, but that was the result of too long in the press. Fortunately, it was during warm-up and no print was inside. I am careful to monitor the time (2 minutes for FB paper at 195; cooler for RC) when dry mounting a print.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,066
    We tried using foamcore in school (architecture) in the 70's and found that sometimes it would be ok, but too often, different areas in the sheet would "collapse" from heat/pressure, and you never knew when or where. I don't think it is made with enough consistency for this, and sometimes the sheet had a "low spot" in it before mounting, which would not bond. However, there was a bonding tissue we could use, called Fusion 4000, I think, which worked at a lower temp, and actually fused itself to the two surfaces. It was great stuff, but very expensive. We also bonded with masonite, which we also used for some presentations. We mounted photographs and drawings.

  6. #16
    ROL
    ROL is offline
    ROL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    794
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael A. Smith View Post
    1. When tacking the tissue to the print, as Greg Davis wrote above, tack only one spot in the center. Do not drag the tacking iron across the print--and certainly not in an "x."

    2. When tacking the trimmed print and tissue to the mount board, tack two adjacent corners ONLY. If you tack all four and the print is not PERFECTLY taut, you will get a wrinkled print.

    3. As Greg also wrote: Cut your overmat first. Then position the print in the overmat. No straight edge needed. No measuring needed.

    4. When lining up the overmat with the mount board, make sure the top is aligned--not opposite corners, not the bottom. usually one hinges the overmat to the mount board, and since you will be hinging them together at the top, it is crucial that the tops are aligned.

    There are probably a few other things, too, but these are the ones that come readily to mind.

    Michael A. Smith
    Wow, I naively thought of the effort as a "gift". I had not seen such a simple video anywhere before, and based on the number of recurring novice questions in threads, hoped a visual on "classic" mounting technique might be helpful. The video is intended, as stated, to accompany my text/photo article in which nearly all of your criticisms are addressed (including "overmatting"), albeit briefly. This 10 minute introductory video's intent was never to be the last word on archival methods, nor an hour long master class. Mounting prints does take some experience, rigor and care. Keep in mind that I'm not selling anything used in the video. In fact the print itself is a one-off gift, now winging its way to Stanley, Idaho.

    1. The print/tissue tack can be anything you wish (and, I usually do use a single short line), but I have found a small tack simply will not hold the print securely enough to prevent its separation from the print during the rest of the process before actual mounting. Unfortunately, this first tack is crucial. If the print becomes separated from the tissue at the first tack, it will be very difficult, if not impossible, to return to the print and be re-tacked. This can happen all too easily during the trimming of the print/tissue to size, perhaps necessitating destroying the print and starting anew with a fresh print. Suction between the working surface and the tissue, alone may pull an inadequately adhered tissue from the print. Making the center tack substantial, whatever that means to you, and with a tacking iron heated sufficiently to melt the tissue quickly, will adhere the print to the tissue securely, without wrinkling.

    2. The video shows tacking 3 corners only, not 4. I tack 2 or 3 corners, depending on the size of the print.

    3. I think your point confuses overmatting methods with dry mounting. Concerning dry mounting: As stated in the supporting article, I often cut windows and mats for any particular job all at once. I often keep a correctly sized window at hand to confirm positioning before/while tacking print/tissue to mount. Given that there may be slight differences between window and mount dimension, that the mounted print and window may become (purposely) separated, and that many people prefer the bottom window margin somewhat larger (for the purposes of adding a signature to the mount), I consider not establishing the print's position on its mount as accurately as possible before dry mounting to be professionally reckless.

    4. True, if you are overmatting and hinge-mounting – a method of presentation I employ with "plastic" prints, not fiber prints. Just not the subject of a video on dry mounting.

    Using these techniques with the limited consumer-oriented equipment I have (I'm not a professional anything), I don't get "wrinkled" mounted prints, except during the mounting processs of very large prints, a subject and altered technique also described in my supporting article. I believe the supporting video and Techniques articles I write from time to time on my site are clear in their intention:

    "These articles are geared primarily to the enthusiastic beginner/intermediate darkroom worker. It is unlikely that the information herein will be other than of casual interest to the seasoned darkroom artist, except as a chronicle of my particular methods."

    I look forward to seeing "a few other things..." when you post your video.

    BTW, my video was done with a 5 year old, point and shoot, obtained in a free promotion.

  7. #17
    ROL
    ROL is offline
    ROL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    794
    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Ullsmith View Post
    Ha ha. Completely unrealistic video. Workspace is far too organized, clean and uncluttered to accomplish anything.
    Did you fail to notice the whitewater kayak standing in the corner?

  8. #18
    ROL
    ROL is offline
    ROL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    794
    Quote Originally Posted by walbergb View Post
    Pros & cons of using foam board as a backing for dry mounting a print?
    I have tried foamcore on occasion, but have not been successful to my satisfaction. I hinge-mount "plastic" prints (thinking of adding this technique to my site's article) to foam board and "overmat" them. Foamcore was not considered archival the last time I looked at it – admittedly a few years ago, despite the fact it may be skinned with buffered paper. So that pretty much precludes using it as an archival technique.

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    25
    I really need to start printing things more. Thanks for all the tips.

  10. #20

    Join Date
    May 2011
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2
    This was really helpful. Thanks.

    When you send your prints off, do you send anything with them?

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin