Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,926   Posts: 1,585,092   Online: 841
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 23
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    333
    You're trying too hard... it's the book. Top line of his header.

    Here's the link... again, Chapter 12, to start.

    http://www.wilhelm-research.com/book_toc.html

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    florida
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,186
    Images
    2
    A rail mounted matte cutter will give more consistently professional cuts than a free-hand Dexter with a straight edge. I would also frame with a metal frame such as the Nielsen frames and definitely under glass. Use archival board and over matte with 4ply or 8ply board. I only dry mount when necessary (now) using archival corners because if a purchaser wants to re-frame to a different size an accidentally miss cut matte could ruin a print. Also humidity stains on a matte especially in a location you don't control would be a problem.

    Remember you are presenting your art and "good enough" is not what sells.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

  3. #13
    holmburgers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Rochester NY (native KS)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,423
    Images
    2
    Thanks guys.

    Mr Bill, excellent, got it now. Funny enough.. that book is in my car at the moment (seriously) (thinking about going to grad school for photo preservation-esque stuff, but haven't read it yet!)

    Jeff, yes I see your point, but my MO is always to achieve high-quality with low-cost. I'm not gonna put the cart before the horse and go buy a mega-cutter, I'm going to cut my teeth on the Dexter. I like the archival corners idea better than dry-mounting for sure. Framing at this point is just too much overhead; I'm gonna see how it goes at first and go from there.

    That being said, how do I make a "mat-sandwich" sturdy enough by itself w/o a frame?
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    florida
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,186
    Images
    2
    If you don't frame, use glass and one of the gallery clips. They are cheap and in a restaurant who knows when a (food fight) or someone with greasy fingers decides to touch your pictures.

  5. #15
    holmburgers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Rochester NY (native KS)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,423
    Images
    2
    Also a good idea.

    Ok, I think I'm starting to imagine what these might look like.
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    333
    BTW, in Chapter 11, top of page 378, is a paragraph about the use of "an ordinary household iron."

  7. #17
    holmburgers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Rochester NY (native KS)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,423
    Images
    2
    Awesome, I'll check it out this evening (I'm at work currently).
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    36
    Regarding dry mounting with a househod iron - years ago when I had no access to a dry mounting press (still don't) I tried it with FB. I found it alnost impossible to avoid bubbles, so I definitely don't recommend it.
    [FONT="Microsoft Sans Serif"][/FONT]Chuck B

  9. #19
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,952
    Images
    60
    This may be a bit anal, but ....

    "mat" - means the window thing in front of your print, which is cut using a "mat cutter"
    "matte" refers to surface texture

    and as for "Matt", well isn't it self-explanatory?
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  10. #20
    holmburgers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Rochester NY (native KS)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,423
    Images
    2
    haha
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin