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  1. #11
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    Look for a copy of the book "Conservation of Photographs". It is by the people at Kodak and the George Eastman House collection. It covers this topic well.
    It's also over 25 years old.

    I personally think that photographs should be attached completely to a backing board, like they are in drymounting. Museum curators can bite their nails all they want; that's their job not mine. However, drymounting becomes difficult for large prints. In particular I will need to mount some 20x24 and larger RC (gasp) silver prints in the near future. It would be nice to know what wet-mounting options there are available in 2011, and how well they work and how they can be expected to last. I know in The Print Ansel goes over wet-mounting FB prints using, if I remember correctly, regular white glue. I doubt that would work for RC prints so I'm looking at either 3M spray or some other sticky product.
    f/22 and be there.

  2. #12
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    Any adhesive that has petroleum is bad for the print. Here's a link on mounting prints by Ted Forbes.

    http://aop.thepublicbroadcast.com/ep...g-on-a-budget/

    He does it somewhat archivally that should make your photo last a long while.

  3. #13
    Greg Davis's Avatar
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    There are plenty of "acid free" boards with pressure sensitive adhesive already on them. I used them on RC prints in the past. It is best if you can use a roller station or vacuum press to create a lot of pressure. Even though it was "acid free" it shortened the life of the RC paper to only a few years. I kept samples to see the long term effects while I was working at that studio. Degradation began to show after 4 years. I have used sprays, but they simply do not adhere well at all. Seal makes a film called Optimount for adhering prints to Plexiglas that is supposed to work well, but again, you need a good amount of pressure to get good adhesion.
    www.gregorytdavis.com

    Did millions of people suddenly disappear? This may have an answer.

    "No one knows that day or hour, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father." -Matthew 24:36

  4. #14
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    What kind of degredation did you notice? Was it yellowing, or cracking of the resin?
    f/22 and be there.

  5. #15
    ROL
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    You don't have to dry mount, or even attach a print permanently to any mount if you don't want to. You can do anything you want to with your prints. Anectdotal opinions about the inadequate longevity of dry mounting may in fact suggest more about the working methods of the specific worker. A visit to any showing of AA's prints will reveal dry mounted prints coming up to 80 or so years (I have perfectly fine, dry mounted, personal prints, over 35 years old – I guess I must have messed up somehow ). Worrying about what some curator may do with your prints is about as absurd as planning what you will buy with the millions you will win from your lottery ticket. Glue 'em down if ya want!

    You can, however, achieve a nicely presented print, without permanent adhesion, by using mounting corners (easiest, as previously suggested), or hanging with linen tape, and overmatting (i.e., cutting a beveled window to cover both the mounting corners and sufficient print margins). Just make certain you can print with sufficiently crisp margins with a good easel, planned large enough to accommodate the corners or tape, and signing if you wish. BTW, overmatting into the print area itself, while perhaps enabling visible cropping, may inevitably result in a sharply cut bevel edge digging into and injuring the printed emulsion. The only difficulty will be getting fiber prints (especially larger; RC not so much) as flat and smooth as possible – for which a mounting press will be invaluable – but then it seems the use of an expensive press is often at the root of many beginner's objections to dry mounting. Do I need to make a video on this too?!?
    Last edited by ROL; 04-15-2011 at 11:15 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: period

  6. #16
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    Is there a problem with drymounting RC prints? Does anyone have any old or vintage dry-mounted RC prints?
    f/22 and be there.

  7. #17
    Greg Davis's Avatar
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    The prints display yellowing. I processed them beyond archival standards, including selenium toning. The only variable was the mounting board. I have dry mounted RC prints without a problem. Just make sure you follow the temperature guidelines with the tissue.
    www.gregorytdavis.com

    Did millions of people suddenly disappear? This may have an answer.

    "No one knows that day or hour, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father." -Matthew 24:36

  8. #18
    fdi
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    I am the owner of Frame Destination, Inc. and we have lots of picture mounting information on our website here: photo mounting techniques

    If I have white border space around the image I will often just use photo or mounting corners. If I do not I will use a modified version of the t-hinge but I will apply the hinging tape to the back of the mat and instead of the mounting or backing board so that I do not have to worry about making the t.

    A museum will be more likely to use something like a water activated wheat starch based adhesive and Japanese hinging tissue. That is done so that the print can be completely removed from the frame and restored to its original condition. Very weak hinging tissue is used so that if the print gets stressed the tissue will tear before the print does. This is critical for some rare artwork, but not for my prints so I just use an acid free hinging tape that may not be 100% reversible, but is not introducing harmful chemicals into the frame package.

    Cheers,
    Mark

  9. #19
    fdi
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    By the way, if you are new to framing you might find our picture framing glossary helpful in understanding some of the terms.

    http://www.framedestination.com/Pict..._Glossary.html

    Cheers,
    Mark

  10. #20
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    Better Sense and Christopher Crawford (who is NOT a troll):

    I did not wish to post this but what Better Sense said gave me new credibility for mankind. I, too, am sick and tired of the 'authorities' stating just what can and cannot be done. For example, take stick glue (non toxic): I honestly believe that a light coating on the back of a print will not amount to any damage long term. Likewise, today's double stick adhesives are very clean. Take standard copy paper, cheap as hell: when was the last time you saw a yellowed piece of old copy paper. I'm 61 and when I was a kid Scotch tape yellowed the paper it was pasted on within a few months. Today, it stays clear.

    In summation, my prints are not Ansel Adams material. Even if I went the strictly archival route there would be atmospheric pollutants to worry about and every archivist knows that. Still, the dire warnings persist. I am not knocking people like Christopher Crawford nor am I fully embracing the comforting and refreshing, but maybe cautiously adhered to, mentality of Better Sense, but we collectively do seem to lose a bit of a distilled perception of good old common sense when we repeat, ad infinitum, just what MUST be worshiped upon the altar of authority.

    The biggest joke and lie out there is that developers inevitably go bad with time. I have reiterated many times that stored in clear plastic soda or juice bottles, filled to the very brim, even highly dilute developers will last indefinitely and I can prove this. Still the disquieting realization that the 'Word' might be challenged cause most of us to gather around the wagons to get ready to defend whatever.

    In the 70s when I was living in New York (THE center of photography then) snobbery was rife with 'essential' darkroom apparatus. One simply 'never thought' to go to a housewares section of a discount store or dollar store for a developing tray nor did one think (heaven forbid) of going to a hardware store to get the requisite thermometer. Thus, photo stores sold the same stuff, in many instances, for a lot more.

    Regardless of the viewpoints expressed here, we all have value. True, authoritative statements DO have much time-won credibility. But time does pass and industry does hear all, especially about the purchasers wanting products to be getting cleaner and cleaner. We need to attenuate the WORD with a 'dynamic common sense' that lives in a world of changing conditions. - David Lyga

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