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  1. #1
    Sean's Avatar
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    Have taken the Home Mat Board Cutting Plunge

    Well, NZ isn't exactly a mat board friendly nation, so I figure it's best I cut my own mats to reduce long term costs. After some research I purchased a mat cutter on ebay, got a good deal on a LOGAN 650 PRO 40" MAT CUTTER. It seems to be a high spec machine, and hopefully idiot proof! It also has a 45min instructional video. I'm wondering if anyone has this model, and if so any insider tips to the model (or mat cutting experiences) would be interesting to know about. Thanks

  2. #2
    Alex Hawley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sean
    Well, NZ isn't exactly a mat board friendly nation, so I figure it's best I cut my own mats to reduce long term costs. After some research I purchased a mat cutter on ebay, got a good deal on a LOGAN 650 PRO 40" MAT CUTTER. It seems to be a high spec machine, and hopefully idiot proof! It also has a 45min instructional video. I'm wondering if anyone has this model, and if so any insider tips to the model (or mat cutting experiences) would be interesting to know about. Thanks
    WOW Sean, you went towards the high end. I just got the small Logan portable a few weeks ago. The biggest challenge I have is keeping things square. Might have to get creative and whip that problem. Other than that, change blades before they start making ragged cuts. After the requisite number of flubs, it ain't so bad.

    Oh, and after 30+ years of engineering work, NOTHING is idiot-proof.
    Semper Fi & God Bless America
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  3. #3
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Haven't used that one, but I think I've seen it, and it looks like a good one.

    With any of them--keep lots of extra blades on hand, and change blades often.

    Every time I do a large mat, I change blades, and if I'm doing 11x14's, I change every few boards. I use an old-style Dexter mat cutter and t-square, so you might be able to make a blade last a little longer if you have a more heavy-duty setup with a cutter that is fixed to a channel on the straightedge, but blades are cheap enough that it's worth it to change often and get clean cuts every time.
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    Cool! I use a basic Logan Compact. Change blades a lot. Especially, during humid days when the boards get a little more moisture. It tends to bunch up at the corners. I use mine on the floor with my knees on the blade guide, and it helps to keep the matt from slipping as well.

  5. #5
    Sean's Avatar
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    Thanks for the tips,

    Yeah I figured if I am going to take the time to cut my own mats then spending a little extra on the cutter could save a lot of aggrevation. The difference between the mid and high spec Logan models were like $100 so went with the high spec one..

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    I've got one of the Logan hand ones but it has a matching ruler with a channel that the cutter runs along as a guide. Works great... stops you wandering away from a steel rule. I think its called a 'Adapt-a-rule'

    As everyone has said... change blade often. Also pay attention and learn what happens at the start and finish of cuts. Because the blade pokes in at an angle, I find I have to start the cut inside my marked line and finish after the next marked line. Hopefully you end up with no overcuts and the cut bit drops out without any extra work with a blade!!!! I cut on an old piece of matt board (on top of a self healing mat) as I find the self healing mat is too tuff for the blade to run along/in smoothly. With the matt board base you can run the blade a bit deeper to ensure the cut is clean. Nothing worse than not going right threw the one your cutting (well there is one thing.. cutting from the wrong side of the line). The other trick I learnt from someone, was to rub the edges of the cut window with the back of a spoon. Just softens them slightly and IMO looks better. Try it on a test cut and see what you think.

  7. #7
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    I use the cheap one too.
    Maybe there is something here that you will find useful: http://www.dickblick.com/info/loganmatcutting/
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  8. #8

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    Hi Sean, I use a 750 (I think) and it's a wonderful tool. People have already mentioned the sharp blade business. The other important thing if you're buying big board to cut down: don't assume that it's square, because more often than not it isn't.

    Have fun -- I think you'll be impressed.

  9. #9
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    I've got the 650 logan and like it better than the other logans because it doesn't have bladeholder thing sliding across the matte leaving a shiny stripe. The only thing I don't like is running out of razorblades and finding out theyre different than the ones for the other models.

  10. #10
    127
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    I used a basic rotary cutter to cut 16 or so mattes recently.

    the only advice I can give is that it gets much easier after a little practise. the first couple of that batch were hard going (I'd done a few before but not many), but after doing 16, I was cutting them faster than the person I was working with could get them in the frames.

    Ian

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