Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,898   Posts: 1,521,037   Online: 749
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 18 of 18
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Chicago
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    103
    Yes. That's why I decided to post two wide shots, a simple one and a complex one: a wide can include so much that it can make it difficult to handle it all. Really, a picture should have as little as possible in it--just the important things to make your point. When the lens includes half the world in front of you, that can be difficult to do.

  2. #12
    coigach's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Inverness-shire, Scotland
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,483
    Images
    71
    I shoot mostly landscapes on 6x7 medium format.

    Reckon I use these lenses in order of use for landscapes (all lenses are given as their 35mm equivalent): 35mm, 50mm, 150mm, 28mm. For macro close-up nature patterns etc I use a macro lens. Intereseting as the 28mm is usually seen as the 'landscape photographers' lens but I often find it too wide, I like the perspective of the 35mm a lot better. At first I even had a 24mm lens but sold this as it was way to wide for how I see the world.

    I also use a 617 pano and found the more common 90mm (roughly equivalent to about 28mm) too wide and use a 150mm lens which is equivalent to a wide standard.

    You should try as many different focal lengths from friends cameras etc and see which suits your shooting style best.

    Hope this helps.

  3. #13
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    the villages .centralflorida,USA and Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,365
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by stark_674 View Post
    Hi all,

    I am writing for some simple questions:

    1. WHEN, in which situation you shot with wide, standard and tele lens?
    2. Which are your favourites focal lenghts (24x36 and/or Medium Format) and why?

    I am starting to purchase some lenses and I am curious on how to use different focal lenght...
    Thanks
    my rule of thumb for a basic kit is:
    1.standard lens=format diagonal
    2.wide for landscape=1/2 standard
    3.long for portraiture=double the standard
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  4. #14
    Andrew K's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    499
    When I used to carry only 3 lenses (when I was using Canon NF1's) I used to carry one of the following 3 outfits:

    14mm f2.8, 35mm f2 and 200mm f2.8 - this was the "in case" outfit, as the 14mm was what you would call a real wide (and rectilinear so no distortion), 35mm because you could shoot pretty much anything with it, and the difference between 14mm and 35mm was staggering, and 200mm because it was a big step from 35mm, and f2.8 was a wonderful aperture to shoot at.

    24mm f2.8, 50mm f1.4 (old FD) and 100mm f2 - 3 lenses that you could easily shoot a wedding with...

    and then there was the "motorsport outfit" - 300mm f2.8 (my "standard lens for sport"), 200 f2.8 (for when the 300 was a bit too long), and a 24mm or 35mm for wide shots....

    Now days if I shoot film it's with an EOS so I use my 17-40L, 28-70L and either 70-200L or 100-400L (depending on whether I know what I'll be shooting or not).....

    My honest opinion is to use whatever lenses work for you....
    A camera is only a black box with a hole in it....

    my blog...some film, some digital http://andrewk1965.wordpress.com/

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    43
    Quote Originally Posted by Newt_on_Swings View Post
    Take a look at this, very simple explanations that are straight forward, and a good visual comparison between the lenses and their effects.

    http://www.photomatters.org/lens-matters

    Ultimately the availability of different lens choices allows the photographer to decide how to portray their subject, the more lenses available to you the more possibilities afforded in those taking situations. Everybody will have a particular feel about what they like in focal lengths. Ask yourself about the application and the goal you are seeking to obtain with your photographs, and the choice of lenses will be obvious. Also be wary about the lust for speed, it'll end up costing you an arm and a leg, and is a hard thing to give up when you have a taste of it.
    Thanks a lot for the useful link.....

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    43

    Tahnks

    Quote Originally Posted by mdarnton View Post
    I think 28/50/90 is a good recommendation, and what I started with, but I rarely use my 90, because I do like to get in close. Still, it's good to have.

    In general, a wide angle makes the picture look more like you are involved with the subject, surrounded by the picture and the subject, and really present in the situation. Wides tend to show background, both because their depth of focus is greater and because they take in a proportionally wider sweep of the background that can't be ignored in the picture, and so it needs to be somehow used as part of the picture. They exaggerate space and make a more exciting, but also more complex, picture:

    21mm:

    Bootjack Equestrians by Michael Darnton, on Flickr

    28mm:

    Art Institute by Michael Darnton, on Flickr

    Longer lenses feel like you are standing at a distance, uninvolved and watching. They can also be used isolate the subject by throwing the surroundings out of focus. If you're concerned about the environment of a picture, use a wide; for isolating details, a longer lens. They're often used for portraits, to isolate the face:

    85mm:

    Russell by Michael Darnton, on Flickr

    The normal lens, the 50, stands in the middle, neutral to some extent, though it tends more towards isolating than encompassing. Think of it as the way you'd normally see, with a bit of surroundings, but still concentration on the central subject.

    50mm:

    Liz, at home by Michael Darnton, on Flickr
    Only a few af raws wirtten in this way can give to me a BIG step forward on enjoying Photography... Thanks to all again.......

  7. #17
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,998
    Quote Originally Posted by stark_674 View Post
    Hi all,

    I am writing for some simple questions:

    1. WHEN, in which situation you shot with wide, standard and tele lens?
    2. Which are your favourites focal lenghts (24x36 and/or Medium Format) and why?

    I am starting to purchase some lenses and I am curious on how to use different focal lenght...
    Thanks
    1. Use the lens which lets you compose the way you want to. Some choose the lens to crop the subject, others to change the perpective.
    2. 35mm: 20mm or 21mm, 28mm, 50mm or 58mm, 200mm or higher. I have a 20mm to 35mm Nikon Zoom, 28mm to 200mm Nikon Zoom, and a 28mm to 300mm Zoom. For MF 38mm, 50mm, 80mm, 150mm and 250mm.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  8. #18
    benjiboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    U.K.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,668
    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    my rule of thumb for a basic kit is:
    1.standard lens=format diagonal
    2.wide for landscape=1/2 standard
    3.long for portraiture=double the standard
    I agree with you Ralph, this is a very good strategy that gets the best "bang for you're buck " in avoiding spending money on lenses that that don't produce a significantly different visual result from each other, but bearing in mind that a few m/m in focal length of a wide angle lens is much more apparent in the resultant picture than in a telephoto one.
    Last edited by benjiboy; 01-20-2012 at 05:56 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Ben

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin