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  1. #11
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ambar View Post
    Thanks Keith!
    Pre Flashing the film seems like an interesting idea I will most definitely try..!!
    However what do you mean with GNDs? Neutral Density filters?
    Gradual Neutral Density. The density changes gradually across the surface of the filter. It's used a lot for lowering exposure in bright skies, for example, while retaining detail in a darker foreground.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  2. #12
    Ambar's Avatar
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    I see.. I've known about these but never used one.. I'm not quite sure if it'll fit into my shooting style.
    It's worth checking out though..!

  3. #13
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  4. #14
    wildbill's Avatar
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    sunny days, no grads, sounds like velvia isn't your shooting style. I shoot a lot of it but almost never shoot it in direct sun, the film just isn't capable of handling that contrast ratio if you're looking for professional results. And pull processing without color shifts, GOOD LUCK!
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix

  5. #15
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by keithwms View Post
    Pre-flash it. I think you can first shoot something called a "whi-bal" or put a semitransparent white object (tupperware lid!) over the lens, where it is out of focus and provides a good even light. You then expose the slide ~4 stops faster than your metered exposure. And voila, lower contrast slide film.

    Slide shooters also tend to use GNDs and such just to rein in the contrast of a scene.

    I would recommend using astia...
    White balance body cap, widely available in digimon stores for virtually any camera body be it digital or film (that is, what fits digi, also fits film bodies!).
    Reducing Velvia's contrast though reduces the effect that Velvia sets out in the first place, using contrast and palette to deliver punch, in lighting matched to the design parameters of the film. The heavy contrast and touchy latitude can be too much for some people, but like everything, you get better with it with lots of experience! Provia 100 is a good, lower contrast alternative but a pastier palette. Experimentally, GNDs with multi-patter/evaluative metering systems can confuse the reading. Run tests specific to your camera before committing a GND to an important shoo.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  6. #16
    polyglot's Avatar
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    Velvia can work great in full sun, you just have to be sure to expose using the Sunny-16 rule instead of your meter and make sure there is nothing deeply-shadowed in your scene. At Sunny-16 with a CPL, you will get deep dark skies, perfect foreground-exposure and nicely-exposed bright-but-not-blown clouds, it all comes together quite well.

    OTOH, Fuji says it's fine to pull-process it by one stop by reducing the duration of first-developer. You could certainly reduce contrast that way though it might have an effect on saturation.

  7. #17
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    Transparency material doesn't have great latitude. I used to shoot 4x5 transparency material for commercial work and I had to proof it all with Polaroid. Luckily, I used studio lights where I can fill dark shadows and used flags to gobo off hot spots. I'd rather work with neg film. Doing photography shows what great latitude our eyes have.

  8. #18
    wildbill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by polyglot View Post
    Velvia can work great in full sun, you just have to be sure to expose using the Sunny-16 rule instead of your meter and make sure there is nothing deeply-shadowed in your scene. At Sunny-16 with a CPL, you will get deep dark skies, perfect foreground-exposure and nicely-exposed bright-but-not-blown clouds, it all comes together quite well.

    OTOH, Fuji says it's fine to pull-process it by one stop by reducing the duration of first-developer. You could certainly reduce contrast that way though it might have an effect on saturation.
    And introduces a color cast, they don't mention that.
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix

  9. #19
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    What!? A polariser in bright sun for Velvia!? Come off the glue.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  10. #20

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    No actually, using a polarizer in bright sun makes a lot of sense. Properly used, the polarizer will bring down the brightness of the sky (sort of) like a graduated ND filter. This makes your meter think there's less light, so it increases the exposure. This makes the shadows less dark. Bringing down the brightness of the sky is reducing contrast of the scene, and since we know how contrasty Velvia 50 is, it should allow a bit more shadow detail without completely blowing out the sky.

    ME Super

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