Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,900   Posts: 1,521,090   Online: 998
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16
  1. #1
    Nicole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,548
    Images
    8

    Cross Processing E6 for best Skin Tones

    Hi everyone

    I'm interested in trying out some cross-processing (portraits).

    1) I don't develop my own
    2) I'm looking for some helpful hints on how best to shoot with E6 for X-processing
    3) And how to communicate with a lab to try and get the best skin tones possible

    Any tips/suggestions/warnings are most welcome.

    Thanks everyone!
    Kind regards
    Nicole

  2. #2
    Nicole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,548
    Images
    8
    Sorry, I forgot to mention that I shoot with a
    Nikon F90X 35mm &
    Hasselblad 501c/m
    if that's relevant to anyone...

  3. #3
    jd callow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Milan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,002
    Images
    117
    Crossprocessing to achieve skin tones is a bit like swimming up a waterfall. The nature of crossprocessing is that it reduces latitude, blocks up quickly and returns moderate to strong colour cross over.

    If you're happy with everything else in the frame going off the charts then it is possible. You will need flat lighting. I can tell you which film I would think is best for this (kodak ept/160t or e200 or in 35mm only kodaks 1600), but I think you'd be better off running some tests. Shooting chromes is pretty exacting, crossing chromes requires even more precision. If I tell you that I have had luck w/ x film at x exposure in x conditions that would be a start, but not much better than you running some tests your self.

    Kodak films will be slightly better than Fuji (fuji's films turn way green/yellow). Older kodak films (EPP, EPN, EPR) suffer from blue yellow cross over. Newer kodak films go green. When you filter out the green you'll get nice pink skin add (read subtract from the filter pack) some yellow and you'll have really really warm skin tones.

    You can forego the attempt to reproduce proper skin tones, meter normally and get blown out skin and warm shadows.

    You can get as close as possible and ask your lab to the get as close as possible.

    You can mitigate some of the contrast by slightly over exposing (.25 - .5 stop) and pulling the film a full stop. First you have to test the film and know how to expose it normally.

    After you've tested some film you may wish to use some filtering when shooting (adding a mag cc filter to fuji and new kodak films) to eas the pain of printing.

    I find a world of difference between MF and 35mm crossed negs. I would recommend using MF.

    *

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Canada
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    468
    Nicole,

    Check out this link for some samples... (remember that negs can be corrected to alter the bias of the film...)

    When I worked at a lab, we had some customers that routinely cross processed film with different results. Agfa pro films came out with green casts.

    One customer shot a Kodak amateur slide film (Elite 2 100) that cross processed so cleanly it was spectacular. It was grainy, snappy, but the colours were in the normal ballpark. It was great for portraits, which I believe you do most... Hope that gets you closer to your goal,

    joe

  5. #5
    Fintan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Ireland
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,793
    Images
    2
    this is a question I'm interested in for the future.

    Nicole, can I ask you, have you contacted some labs to ask them what you need to do and what they need to do. I'm sure the pro labs have done this several times.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Canada
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    468
    Along that same line... Talk to the technicians where you're getting the work done. They've seen everyone's work, they know what the different combos look like.

    joe

  7. #7
    Nicole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,548
    Images
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by mrcallow
    If you're happy with everything else in the frame going off the charts then it is possible. You will need flat lighting. I can tell you which film I would think is best for this (kodak ept/160t or e200 or in 35mm only kodaks 1600), but I think you'd be better off running some tests. Shooting chromes is pretty exacting, crossing chromes requires even more precision.
    Kodak films will be slightly better than Fuji (fuji's films turn way green/yellow). Newer kodak films go green. When you filter out the green you'll get nice pink skin add (read subtract from the filter pack) some yellow and you'll have really really warm skin tones.
    You can mitigate some of the contrast by slightly over exposing (.25 - .5 stop) and pulling the film a full stop. First you have to test the film and know how to expose it normally.
    Thanks Mr Callow!
    What's considered 'flat lighting'?
    What filters are best used to filter Kodak's green for warm skin tones?
    Kind regards
    Nicole

  8. #8
    titrisol's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Rotterdam
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,671
    Images
    8
    give it a try
    I usually overespose Ektachrome 200 by 1 stop and have it processed as c41.
    I'd reccomend bracketing a roll of film and test it....

    The results are interesting and the tones may or not please you. I'm a frim believer that you have to try it yoursefl
    Mama took my APX away.....

  9. #9
    Nicole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,548
    Images
    8
    Joe & Fintan, thanks for your input. I have only spoken to one lab so far and they are not keen on processing x-processing.... :o) Thanks for the link Joe! I'm looking for more subtle effects than 'high-strung' if that makes any sense.

  10. #10
    jd callow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Milan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,002
    Images
    117
    Quote Originally Posted by Nicole McGrade
    Thanks Mr Callow!
    What's considered 'flat lighting'?
    What filters are best used to filter Kodak's green for warm skin tones?
    Kind regards
    Nicole
    I use a 40cc Magenta filter for e100s/sv

    Most any lab will process e6 for the same price as c41. There is nothing special about it.

    Here a two links to demo pages for a client. The model was shot w/ e100s, rated at iso 25 - 32 (which includes the filter factor for the 40cc mag filter).
    http://69.20.54.220/~visions/base_02.html
    http://69.20.54.220/~visions/base_03.html

    Flat lighting means no strong highlights or shadows and smooth transitions between the two.

    *

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin