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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by doughowk
    My limited experience with low-light situations suggests that Efke 100 as well as J&C Pro 100 are very unreponsive whereas Efke 25 may be a good choice if you want sharp detail without the grain of faster films.
    I have a completely opposite experience re: Efke PL100. I have used it over the summer (about 70 sheets) to take nearly all my interior church scenes in my Places of Worship gallery on my site and on the contact printers gallery. I have exposed and developed Ekfke for scenes from EV 1, and with SBRs from 6 to 15 (N+1 to N-8). Almost all of my interior scenes will print very well on new G2 AZO. The ability to build local contrast very well without increasing overall contrast and density too much is the main reason it is my primary film.
    Francesco

  2. #22

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    I noticed that someone mentioned increasing development in a reciprocity situation. That should be clarified...

    The normal development compensation in reciprocity territory is to reduce development. The reason is that the reciprocity effect may not apply equally to all differing brightness values in a scene. In other words, if one has a situation in which the low values fall in the plus 1 second range but the highlights fall in the minus one second range then the highlights will not be exposed at the reciprocity effect for the film whereas the shadows are exposed at the reciprocity effect. So the normal development compensation is to reduce development since the relative scene brightness ratio is greater then what it would seem.

    Now having said that, if the scene brightness ratio is such that the highlights and shadows all fall within the reciprocity characteristics of the film then one may decide to develop normally (would increase negative contrast) or even to expand development which would increase negative contrast to a greater extent.

  3. #23

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    SO how do you know if the highs fall in the minus 1 sec range?
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  4. #24
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    my work print doesn't show the meter readings. I only had 2 stops difference. Everything was coated in a fine red dust. The walls had been white washed, but they were even sort of pinkish. To get more of a tonal range that is why I added the 20% more to the development time. On plus minus development, I go by how many stops of seperation there are. for 4 to 5 I do normal. for anything 3 to 2 I do +1. anything from 6 to 8 I would do -1. This is my system. If the readings come out more than the above, then I have to decide if I want more or less contrast for the sceneand do +2 or -2 development. That is when my brain hurts.
    Non Digital Diva

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by mark
    SO how do you know if the highs fall in the minus 1 sec range?
    The accurate way to determine where the highs fall is to measure them with a spot meter.

    An example of how this might work and the effects is as follows:

    Lows values measure 4 seconds exposure.
    High values measure 1/15 second exposure

    One would think that normally this would represent a six stop brightness ratio. But when the additional reciprocity is factored in we now have the low values exposed for 8 seconds (proper exposure accounting for reciprocity)and the highlights exposed for 8 seconds (overexposed by seven stops). This pushes the highs up the curve by seven stops. So that we now have a different scene brightness ratio then a simple meter reading would indicate. That is why the departure from normal development procedures in reciprocity is reduced development.

  6. #26

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    Great explanation, Donald, for the increasing contrast that occurs with low-light/night photography. Andrew Sanderson in Night Photography says that the zone system becomes useless because can't properly read the light levels (lights become spectral while shadows become too dark to read) and contrast increases as exposures lengthen. How then are we to determine when to decrease development time & by how much?
    van Huyck Photo
    "Progress is only a direction, and it's often the wrong direction"

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by doughowk
    Great explanation, Donald, for the increasing contrast that occurs with low-light/night photography. Andrew Sanderson in Night Photography says that the zone system becomes useless because can't properly read the light levels (lights become spectral while shadows become too dark to read) and contrast increases as exposures lengthen. How then are we to determine when to decrease development time & by how much?
    In night photography, I would not apply the normal exposure and reduced development at all. For limited spectral light sources, I would first begin by using a catechol based developer such as Pyrocat (see Ansel Adams example in The Negative). Next I would tend to think in terms of expanding contrast at the development stage to afford all of the low value tonal separation that I could obtain. I would probably also downrate the film EI to move the exposure up onto the straightline portion of the H and D curve. I would plan on handling the excessive film contrast at the printing stage by preflashing the paper. Preflashing the paper compresses highvalues downward while maintaining low value tonal separation.

    Insofar as night exposure calculations, one almost needs to test the film under actual conditions if the meter does not read the low light levels.

  8. #28

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    I have two words for you guys, "Fuji Acros". No reciprocity out to at least four minutes, indicated. Sometimes you do get what you pay for.

  9. #29
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    Well it is a good thing I didn't know I couldn't do what I did to get the nice negatives I got. I might have screwed them up. Ignornance is bliss!
    Non Digital Diva

  10. #30

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    Reciprocity & Low-Contrast Scenes

    Thinking about taking advantage of reciprocity failure with low contrast situations. Since most of my exposures on 4X5 are at least a second or more, what if I use ND filters to push the times even longer thereby increasing the contrast. Would this work, and anybody doing it?
    van Huyck Photo
    "Progress is only a direction, and it's often the wrong direction"

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