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  1. #11
    andrew.roos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by S.larsson View Post
    So to clear it up once and for all, will my camera meter correctly through the filter in the link above without having to go out and by a hand held meter (seikonic etc)?
    Yes.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by S.larsson View Post
    Thanks for all your answers! As for the questionable filter factor, i just took the numbers off B+W's website... https://www.schneideroptics.com/ecom...D=606&IID=5631

    So to clear it up once and for all, will my camera meter correctly through the filter in the link above without having to go out and by a hand held meter (seikonic etc)?

    Regards from Germany
    Maybe .

    (don't you hate it when answers are unclear, or contradictory)?

    The uncertainty comes from the fact that the information you gain from the meter reading will need to be interpreted with the effect of a polarizing filter in mind.

    To understand this, I'd suggest an experiment. With the filter in place on the camera, take a number of meter readings, each with the polarizer set at a different position on its ring. You should see variation in the readings, because the polarizer tends to filter out the polarized light reflecting from the scene. You have to consider, however, whether it is the polarized light portions of your scene that you want to key into when you are choosing your exposure. In many cases, you are most interested in the other parts of the scene.

    So which of the various meter readings do you choose?

    If you meter separately, without the polarizer in place, and then apply the standard filter factor, you will get consistent exposure of the parts of the scene unaffected by the setting of the ring on the filter. That may lead to better results.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  3. #13
    ROL
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    Quote Originally Posted by S.larsson View Post
    So to clear it up once and for all, will my camera meter correctly through the filter in the link above without having to go out and by a hand held meter (seikonic etc)?
    Well, apparently mine will, but yours is the subject of opinion, just to clear it up.

  4. #14
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by S.larsson View Post
    Thanks for all your answers! As for the questionable filter factor, i just took the numbers off B+W's website... https://www.schneideroptics.com/ecom...D=606&IID=5631

    So to clear it up once and for all, will my camera meter correctly through the filter in the link above without having to go out and by a hand held meter (seikonic etc)?

    Regards from Germany


    If it is a TTL meter, yes.
    But if you are unsure, run a roll of film through the camera with the polariser in place, at midline and maximum effect. Then you will be in no doubt as to what works and does not. Be aware that a polariser set to maximum effect on overcast days e.g. in forests, can make the scene very drab, dark and generally underexposed, which is where you have to be on guard and leverage the exposure with exposure compensation. It all returns to the suggestion of running a roll of film through the camera and actively experimenting. That is the only way you will be sure.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






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