Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,534   Posts: 1,544,052   Online: 1126
      
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 38

Thread: DSLR Metering?

  1. #1
    E.Jensen's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Detroit, MI USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3

    DSLR Metering?

    Hi all,
    I'm new to the whole world of large format, ive been doing digital and 35mm for about 4 years now and I've decided to challenge myself some more. As of right now I do not own a light meter, I probably haven't looked into how to determine exposure with 4x5 enough yet, but i was just wondering, can i use my DSLR (nikon d60) and set it up with the same f/stop and focal length and iso/asa right next to my 4x5 camera and get an exposure like that? or would it make more sense to actually try and mount my D60 onto the back of my 4x5? I think that way I could get an instant result of if I develop everything right what the print could eventually look like. Right? if not please let me know, any suggestion on quick ways to determine exposure, or if i should just go and buy a light meter would be a great help.

    Thanks much!
    -E.Jensen

  2. #2
    brucemuir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Metro DC area, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,264
    Images
    4
    You could use it for a rough guesstimate but considering the time and expense that goes into LF shooting you might as well bite the bullet and get a good spot meter now.

    When I was green I once did a studio shoot with chromes alongside digi and used the digital camera meters setting for the film camera.
    When the film came back I was screwed because the dslr ISO settings (Canon) did not equal the true ISO standard.
    The Provia was all over exposed by about ⅔ to a full stop.

  3. #3
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    SE Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,578
    Images
    15
    Apart from being a silly set up, it is also cumbersome and potentially prone to misleading information: a DSLR uses any manner of matrix/evaluative/partial of combination meter and does not know what it is looking at and furthermore, doesn't care. In LF, you need a good working understanding of the Zone System and this in turn implies an understanding of spot metering. LF is far, fare removed form the nonsenses that is hyper-everything digital: it is photography at its most basic and cerebral where YOU (not the camera) do the thinking and assessment. Invest in a versatile spot/incident/reflected meter, read up on skills, practice and refine those skills to bring out the very best that LF is capable of.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  4. #4
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,270
    Images
    148
    If you know what you're doing it works very successfully. It's not my method of choice but if a meter fails or you've forgotten one it's a good fall-back.

    Ian

  5. #5
    benjiboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    U.K.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,820
    The sensors in digital cameras don't " see" the light in the same way as film, ie I.S.O. on a digital sensor isn't necessarily the same speed as I.S.O. 100 on film even using a separate hand held meter , and before you shoot me down I base this assertion on an article I read in the British version of Professional Photography Magazine a couple of years ago in which they extensively tested this matter, and came to this conclusion, which I still have.
    Last edited by benjiboy; 06-01-2012 at 06:23 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Ben

  6. #6
    36cm2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Northeast U.S.
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    575
    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    If you know what you're doing it works very successfully. It's not my method of choice but if a meter fails or you've forgotten one it's a good fall-back.

    Ian
    +1

    If you can afford a good meter (spotmeter for landscapes), then get one because that's the tool you really need. But if you can't, then I think it's better to shoot with what you have than not shoot at all. Stranded on an island with a can of beans and a rock, I surely wouldn't starve looking for a canopener. Enjoy large format, it's excellent.

    Leo
    "There is a time and place for all things, the difficulty is to use them only in their proper time and places." -- Robert Henri

  7. #7
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,270
    Images
    148
    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    The sensors in digital cameras don't " see" the light in the same way as film, ie I.S.O. on a digital sensor isn't necessarily the same speed as I.S.O. 100 on film even using a separate hand held meter , and before you shoot me down I base this assertion on an article I read in the British version of Professional Photography Magazine a couple of years ago in which they extensively tested this matter, and came to this conclusion, which I still have.
    I've not seen the article but in practice my DSLRs have been fine when I use the readings from my Minolta Spotmeter F, no ISO correction needed (mainly used for metering with studio flash). In addition when using my DSLR alongside va film camera the reading are comparable. That doesn't mean all makes etc will be similar, in the end it's about knowing your equipment.

    In the past I've had occasions where I've needed to use the readings from my Leicameter or Pentax MX while out shooting LF and it's no different using the DSLR metering.

    Ian

  8. #8
    daleeman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Dayton, Ohio
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,005
    Images
    17
    I'm very fond of my hand held meter. One should have one. I also have a Leica M8.2 and use that when out with my M2 and IIIF rangefinders. I have also used it with my 4x5 and had good success. It does not give me perfect success and direct Zone System capability but I've always gotten very acceptable results. With the hand held I can get even better results but my printing skills are adequet to handle most anything I shoot and pay attention to details.

    I second the advice about get out and shoot. It always puts me in a good place.

    Lee

  9. #9
    sandermarijn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Leiden, Netherlands
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    770
    Images
    11
    Sure use that DSLR, why not?

    I use an older Powershot as a light meter for 120. Not always (otherwise incident light meter), but sometimes. Works great. Just make sure to calibrate the ISO values of the P&S once. Earlier Canons are a bit conservative in their rating (64/80 ASA on the Canon equals 100 ASA for the film, something like that).

    In any case, the histogram and the picture on the screen are great for getting a feel for a scene, especially difficult ones.

    If I had an iPhone I would surely use the exposure meter app all the time. From what I've read it works wonderfully well.

  10. #10
    L Gebhardt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    NH - Live Free or Die
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,678
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    18
    Quote Originally Posted by sandermarijn View Post
    If I had an iPhone I would surely use the exposure meter app all the time. From what I've read it works wonderfully well.
    I have several meter apps on the iPhone and they really do work well. Not as nice as my spot meter, but is now my choice when I go out with a folder and black and white film. I like this one: http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/pocke...381698089?mt=8. I'm sure that are good versions for Android and maybe other smart phones.

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin