Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,499   Posts: 1,543,210   Online: 1044
      
Page 1 of 7 1234567 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 64
  1. #1

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Nebraska
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    273

    Portra Color Film shooting advice needed

    I'm off for a trip in less than two weeks. I've decided to shoot film exclusively, even though I've only shot a few rolls. I'm going to take Portra 160 and 400. I shot a roll of 400 a couple weeks ago. I used a light meter and mostly used the settings the light meter gave me in incident mode. I took a few shots where I spot metered the blue sky and whatever I was shooting, and averaged the exposure. All in all most of my shots turned out OK.

    I've read a little about filters for color film. Are there any must have filters I should be taking for Portra? One of the cities we're visiting is around 10,000 feet so I was thinking about taking a UV filter. I read that's good at elevated positions for haze. I'll be shooting landscapes and city/people shots. I've read that shooting under artificial light requires a filter to remove color cast. I'm going to avoid that by switching to B&W film, if I shoot indoors. I also have a linear polarizer I can take.

    The reading I've done in terms of film exposure is geared toward B&W. Are there any differences in use of the zone system or exposure in general that I should know about for Portra?

    I've ordered a few extra rolls of portra and will be practicing with it until I leave.

    Thanks for any advice you can give.
    --
    Kenton Brede
    http://kentonbrede.com/

  2. #2
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    8,352
    Blog Entries
    51
    Images
    441
    Portra 160 is an amazing film, especially for mixed lighting conditions where you have a blend of tungsten, fluorescent and "daylight" balanced light sources. Quite honestly, with that film specifically and with color negative film in general, you really don't need to worry about color correcting filters. If you want to see some examples of what it can do, take a look at my San Francisco nighttime shots -
    http://www.theflyingcamera.com/portf...S=6&i=179794#0
    About the only filters I'd be worrying about at that altitude would be the UV and maybe a polarizer. Where are you going on the trip?

    Your best metering strategy if you have a spot meter, is to pick an object that you want to render the brightness equivalent of medium gray and set your exposure accordingly. Color negative film has so much latitude that you don't need to worry too much about controlling contrast. If you are not confident in your spot metering skills, then stick to incident reading as a general practice.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Nebraska
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    273
    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    Portra 160 is an amazing film, especially for mixed lighting conditions where you have a blend of tungsten, fluorescent and "daylight" balanced light sources. Quite honestly, with that film specifically and with color negative film in general, you really don't need to worry about color correcting filters. If you want to see some examples of what it can do, take a look at my San Francisco nighttime shots -
    http://www.theflyingcamera.com/portf...S=6&i=179794#0
    Good to know that I don't have to worry about mixed lighting. Those are some great shots. What aperture and shutter speed do you generally go with for shots like that?

    About the only filters I'd be worrying about at that altitude would be the UV and maybe a polarizer. Where are you going on the trip?
    We are headed to Ecuador and Galapagos.

    Your best metering strategy if you have a spot meter, is to pick an object that you want to render the brightness equivalent of medium gray and set your exposure accordingly. Color negative film has so much latitude that you don't need to worry too much about controlling contrast. If you are not confident in your spot metering skills, then stick to incident reading as a general practice.
    I'm not very confident about picking out medium gray. My spot metering has been limited to: meter black, close two stops; meter white, open two stops. That and averaging out wide dynamic ranges and hope for the best.
    Thanks,
    --
    Kenton Brede
    http://kentonbrede.com/

  4. #4
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    8,352
    Blog Entries
    51
    Images
    441
    Definitely bring a polarizer, if you're going to the Galapagos. Use it judiciously in Ecuador - it is easy to over-polarize your skies and end up with near-night indigo sky with an otherwise obviously daylit photo when you're at those high altitudes. For the night stuff, I'm always on a tripod, and generally somewhere around 15 seconds to 1 minute 30 seconds, f-stop ranging between f8 and f22. Remember with color negative film you have reciprocity to calculate, but generally it's only 1 stop extra unless your metered exposure time is over 1 minute. What I saw online about Portra 160 is that less than 10 seconds metered exposure requires NO reciprocity correction. 10-100 seconds, 1 stop, and not recommended beyond 100 seconds. Those minute and a half exposures I've done are including reciprocity compensation. Those are rare, however - most exposures are in the 15-30 second range, including reciprocity compensation.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,601
    You're likely to encounter some strong contrasts with fairly bluish shadows under open skies at higher elevations. I would strongly recommend carrying a couple of light balancing filters. I personally
    use an 81A for general overcast, and an 81C for shots in deep blue shade. Don't count on the film
    itself to automatically correct for this. That would be a myth. Things like polarizers are unrelated,
    and are more a creative option. Skylight filters are a more complicated question, and can help with
    UV sensitivity affecting sharpness over distance at high altitude. My experience with this is mainly
    with Portra 160VC, which is probably similar to the current films; and in this case I had the best
    results with a light pinkish-amber Singh-Ray "KN" UV filter.

  6. #6
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Ignacio, CO, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,728
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by kbrede View Post
    Thanks for any advice you can give.
    Shoot at box speed, have fun.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  7. #7
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    13,117
    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    Shoot at box speed, have fun.
    The best advice you can get!
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  8. #8
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Ignacio, CO, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,728
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    If you are worried about color issues, shoot reference frame with a "known" target in the lighting that you are in. Doesn't have to be exotic; a grey card is great but your light meter or a sheet of white paper is just fine.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  9. #9

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Nebraska
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    273
    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    If you are worried about color issues, shoot reference frame with a "known" target in the lighting that you are in. Doesn't have to be exotic; a grey card is great but your light meter or a sheet of white paper is just fine.
    I have to plead ignorance here. What does taking a reference shot of a grey card do?
    Thanks,
    --
    Kenton Brede
    http://kentonbrede.com/

  10. #10
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Ignacio, CO, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,728
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by kbrede View Post
    I have to plead ignorance here. What does taking a reference shot of a grey card do?
    Thanks,
    Having a "known" that is in the same light, in the same scene, allows you or your lab to match color balance to that reference point.

    Doesn't have to be a grey card either. My favorite reference point is the dome on my incident meter but I've profiled my hand, several faces, ...

    In my darkroom I use a Beseler PM2L. I program it (set the dials) to the known reference, say the dome, and adjust the enlarger filters to center up the needle for each dial and I'm ready to print.

    The program is essentially the paper "profile", it does take some work to make the profile but once you have it it's easy as pie to set up. Insert the reference shot, use the PM2L to set the color head, insert the "real" negative, print.

    This typically yields a workable proof with no color cast on the first try.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

Page 1 of 7 1234567 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin