Switch to English Language Passer en langue franšaise Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,908   Posts: 1,521,510   Online: 906
      
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 26 of 26
  1. #21
    artonpaper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    325
    Images
    135
    Just to chime in, if you are using the in-camera meter there is no reason to adjust for the filter factor, at least in theory. When using an external meter tean lowering the ISO is called for. Each ISO designation is a 1/3 stop increment. Using a lower ISO will increase the exposure called for by 1/3 stop. The 1/3 stop convention was determined to be the least noticeable significant exposure change one can make. This was more important to those exposing chromes. If you have difficulty finding the third stop point on the aperture ring, or on those few older lenses with half stop clicks, the 1/2 stop point will do. The difference between 1/3 and 1/2 stop is negligible, especially when shooting negative film. Also my rule of thumb for shooting negative film is to err on the side of overexposure.

  2. #22
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Ignacio, CO, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,589
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    The ISO setting on the camera is only for the camera's meter. If the camera is in manual then the ISO setting on the camera meter has no effect on exposure, period. Only when a camera is in an auto mode does it matter.

    In manual you set the ISO with your film choice, 160 here.

    The other controls you have to affect exposure are aperture, time, and filters.

    Your handheld meter will give you the aperture and time, set them then open up by whatever filter factor is in use.


    Quote Originally Posted by kbrede View Post
    EDIT: OK I just read the two posts above. I understand now. The ISO dial doesn't really open via shutter or aperture, it just changes the in camera's meter reading. I didn't know that.

    This confuses me. If I use a handheld meter and apply the meter settings and then open the aperture 1/3 stop. How is that different from applying the handheld meter reading and opening 1/3 stop via the ISO dial?



    EDIT: And therefore it doesn't matter what the ISO dial is set at.

    But leave the ISO setting on the camera at 160, right?



    I am not using the camera's meter.



    I'm not using two meters. I'm not 100% sure what "two settings" you're referring to. I can program my meter for two ISO settings, 'A' and 'B.' So I could program 'A' with ISO 160 and 'B' with 125. This could be used to more easily meter. One setting for when filter is off, one for on. Maybe that's what you're referring to?



    I'm using a Zeiss Ikon ZI and a Pentax Super ME.
    Thanks,
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Ana´s Nin

  3. #23
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,164
    Images
    289
    Film: ISO 400
    Filter: 2 stops compensation
    Set meter at: EI 100

    Film: ISO 160
    Filter: 1/3 stop compensation
    Set meter at: EI 125
    Filter: 2/3 stop compensation
    Set meter at: EI 100
    Filter: 1 stop compensation
    Set meter at: EI 80
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  4. #24
    Bill Burk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    3,131
    Images
    46
    To clarify for OP... How the ISO dial links to camera behavior seems to be the point of confusion...

    The Pentax ME Super doesn't have an automatic aperture. The f/stop you click is the one you get.

    Some cameras override the aperture in program and shutter priority mode (OM-Program comes to mind). Pentax ME Super doesn't mess with your f/stop once you set it.

    The camera has an electronic shutter. When using Auto - Automatic mode, shutter speed varies automatically and the speed will change by 1/3 stop if you make 1/3 stop change to the ISO dial. (But don't do that for filters since it reads the light through the lens).

    When using M - Manual mode, you get the shutter speed displayed in viewfinder - the shutter does not change 1/3 stop when you change the ISO dial.

    Going to the original plan: Setting meter ISO "B" to 125 is a good idea. Leaving the camera at 160 is a good idea.

  5. #25

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Nebraska
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    273
    Thanks all for your help and sticking with it, until I got it.
    --
    Kenton Brede
    http://kentonbrede.com/

  6. #26

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Aurora, IL
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,936
    Setting the ISO (on the meter) to 125 is convenient as you don't have to apply the filter factor to the reading. However, if you lenses can only be set at full stop or 1/2 stop and your shutter speed at full stop then the meter at times will give you a reading you can not set exactly.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  Ś   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin