Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 74,134   Posts: 1,637,286   Online: 1059
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 23
  1. #11
    jakeblues's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    los angeles
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    40
    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    While I'd say it is certainly a saturated film, it is nowhere near Velvia (Velveeta???). Velvia's colors are super-saturated, and it's also noticeably more of a green/blue bias whereas Ektar is somwhere between neutral and reds/yellows/oranges.
    Couldn't agree more. Blues and greens are saturated but nowhere near velvia tones. Reds/yellows/oranges pop a bit more than other neg films i've shot. That said, I like Ektar a lot. It can be great for cool light like a slightly overcast day or northern geography.

    The one word of warning I have about Ektar is that it can emphasize any redness in a subject's face. Flushed cheeks or warm light can make faces look a bit red.

    Edit:
    Example photo. Note skin tones:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	6202079279_99ef621059_z.jpg 
Views:	114 
Size:	224.6 KB 
ID:	53187

  2. #12
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    8,741
    Blog Entries
    51
    Images
    446
    If you KNOW you're doing portraits, shoot Portra 160, not Ektar. If you don't have a choice, go ahead and use the Ektar, the redness can be tweaked in printing/post-processing unless it's extreme.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Los Osos, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    78
    I shot a roll of Ektar at box speed and it came out with a pretty bad magenta cast, easily fixed though. I shot another at 64 and it came out great. Most of my color work is done on Portra but Ektar is fun to play with sometimes.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Henderson, Nv
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3
    I shoot Ektar 100 in both 120 roll film and 4x5 sheets. Easy to develop at home with the c-41 press kit, easy to scan. I use a spot meter when doing LF, and sunny 16 when using my Yashica D. Very rarely, do I get a poor exposure using 100 iso.
    Here are some Ektar 100 examples taken with my Yashica D
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/8387014...7630831836096/

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    US-based but traveling
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    15
    For spot metering landscapes, what would you recommend? With Velvia I usually meter a highlight and then open up 1 to 1.5 stops. With Provia I meter a highlight and open up 1.5-2 stops.

    I've heard some folks suggest metering Ektar like you would for transparency but to open ~3 stops (unlike other C41 film where you'd spot meter the shadows). What say ye?

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Bruxelles, Belgium
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    61
    I somewhat second robbalbrecht's experience: shot the first roll at box speed, and shadows came out blocked and horribly blotchy (with mid- and highlight tones properly exposed). Next time I will shot at ISO 64 or lower, depending on lighting.

    P.S. Forgot to mention, with proper filtration the said shadows came in very pronounced deep blue.
    Last edited by I.G.I.; 05-07-2013 at 03:55 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #17
    RPC
    RPC is offline

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    495
    I.G.I, many here have advocated shooting at box speed but unless one has tested their meter, metering technique, apertures and shutter speeds for accuracy you can't be sure you are actually getting a box speed exposure. That is why I advocate adding some exposure, up to a stop from box speed to lessen the possibility of underexposure and loss of shadow detail. Any small overexposure will cause no harm. So shooting at lower ISO as you mentioned is a good idea as far as shadow detail is concerned but robbalbrecht's color problem is likely due to scanning errors.

    I optically print Ektar and never have the blue shadow problem any more than any other film. Shot in the sun, any film is likely to have a little blue in the shadows from skylight but Ektar, being a high saturation film, may enhance this.

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    3,305
    Ektar is for adults. Use a light meter, know how to use a light meter, and understand why a light meter needs to be calibrated. If you can
    correctly expose E6 slides, Ektar is a piece of cake.

  9. #19
    polyglot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    South Australia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,443
    Images
    12
    I'm going to try to lay this blue shadows thing to rest once and for all with two shots from the same roll of Ektar.

    The first shot is largely illuminated by sunshine but at the bottom right there are areas in shadow and they are very blue. This is to be expected because they're illuminated by skylight (maybe 12000K) whereas the rest of the scene was balanced for morning sunlight (5000K). Ektar's high saturation enhances the colour-temperature difference between these areas so the shadows look blue because they are blue in real life. If this is the "blue shadows" that people are seeing, it's a function of the mixed lighting and high saturation film. Any chrome will do the same.

    The second shot was taken on the same day in one of those alleys pictured as being blue above. As you can see, it has balanced nicely for the blue light in the scene and the image looks pretty neutral to me. Note also that there is NO shift in hue towards blue in the shadows here because Ektar doesn't actually have such a shift. With uniform lighting colour-temp, Ektar gives neutral results all the way from shadows to highlights.

  10. #20
    Alan Klein's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    New Jersey .........formerly NYC.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    556
    Quote Originally Posted by magneticred View Post
    I shoot Ektar 100 in both 120 roll film and 4x5 sheets. Easy to develop at home with the c-41 press kit, easy to scan. I use a spot meter when doing LF, and sunny 16 when using my Yashica D. Very rarely, do I get a poor exposure using 100 iso.
    Here are some Ektar 100 examples taken with my Yashica D
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/8387014...7630831836096/
    Those are great photos. How did you scan them and what PP did you use?

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin