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  1. #91
    Ross Chambers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    Shillings. Schilling sounds Dutch.

    It's easy. Tuppence is obvious (two pence). Four farthings to a penny, twelve pennies to a shilling, twenty shillings to a pound (240 pence). And don't forget the Guinea - worth one pound and one shilling. It was originally a one pound coin but the price of gold went up so the value of the coin had to otherwise it would have been worth more in gold than its face value.


    Steve.
    12 was always a sensible base for currency, divisible by 2 3 4 and 6.

    Guineas were popular in art dealer circles; that extra shilling added up quite nicely for a big sale.

  2. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by zsas View Post
    I'm buying a camera where all distance is done in meters. Well, schooling here standardized on feet. Any tricks any of you used to retrain you mind to evaluate in meters? I am aware of the conversion 3 feet = .91 meter, just currious if there are any "tricks" or things that help get the mind to convert faster?
    Don't convert. Think in meters or think in feet.
    Get it right in the camera, the first time...

  3. #93
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ross Chambers View Post
    12 was always a sensible base for currency, divisible by 2 3 4 and 6.

    Guineas were popular in art dealer circles; that extra shilling added up quite nicely for a big sale.
    We got counting in twelve s from the Vikings Ross, and we still buy eggs and many other things in dozens, although a bakers dozen is thirteen.
    Before the U.K adopted metric currency many up market shops priced their products in guineas, it was some sort of mark of exclusivity.
    Ben

  4. #94

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    Shillings. Schilling sounds Dutch.

    It's easy. Tuppence is obvious (two pence). Four farthings to a penny, twelve pennies to a shilling, twenty shillings to a pound (240 pence). And don't forget the Guinea - worth one pound and one shilling. It was originally a one pound coin but the price of gold went up so the value of the coin had to otherwise it would have been worth more in gold than its face value.


    Steve.
    Schilling may sound Dutch, but it is Austrian. What about crowns?

  5. #95
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Not sure of the origin but a Crown was five shillings (or 60 pence). Four Crowns to the pound. There was also a half Crown which was two Shillings and six Pence. In conversation, the Shillings and Pence were not normally spoken so something costing half a Crown might also be described as costing two and six.

    And something which confused me for a long time when I was a child was that the sign for a Pound (£) was really 'L' and the sign for Pence was 'D'.

    I couldn't work out why the price label marked 4D actually meant four Pence. Even more confusing was the transition period between the old currency and decimal when most things in the shops had two prices. Did the same thing happen in Europe when the Euro was (almost) universally adopted?


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  6. #96
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    Not sure of the origin but a Crown was five shillings (or 60 pence). Four Crowns to the pound. There was also a half Crown which was two Shillings and six Pence. In conversation, the Shillings and Pence were not normally spoken so something costing half a Crown might also be described as costing two and six.

    And something which confused me for a long time when I was a child was that the sign for a Pound (£) was really 'L' and the sign for Pence was 'D'.

    I couldn't work out why the price label marked 4D actually meant four Pence. Even more confusing was the transition period between the old currency and decimal when most things in the shops had two prices. Did the same thing happen in Europe when the Euro was (almost) universally adopted?


    Steve.
    I think I can clear that up Steve, the £ sign looks like a capital L because it comes from a denomination of Roman coinage the Libra, and the D a smaller denomination the Denarious, because remamber the Romans occupied Britain for four hundred years.
    Last edited by benjiboy; 08-06-2012 at 09:33 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Ben

  7. #97

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    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    I think I can clear that up Steve, the £ sign looks like a capital L because it comes from a denomination of Roman coinage the Libra, and the D a smaller denomination the Denarious, because remamber the Romans occupied Britain for four hundred years.
    The Romans gave us 'ounce', from "uncia", as well.

  8. #98
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    I think I can clear that up Steve
    Oh yes, I know all that now. I was confused when I was six years old!!


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  9. #99
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    These metric advocates are terrible. Give them 2.54 centimetres and they'll take 1.61 kilometres.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  10. #100
    lxdude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post


    And something which confused me for a long time when I was a child was that the sign for a Pound (£) was really 'L' and the sign for Pence was 'D'.

    And we still have nails designated in pennies, like 10d, 6d, etc. Which I think related to weight, as nails don't cost that much!
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

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