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  1. #51
    Leigh B's Avatar
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    So you expect crack heads to know proper usage?

    At least now you have enough money for that new lens.

    - Leigh
    “Wise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something.” - Plato

  2. #52

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    No, I just expect crackheads to pay cash.

    I'm saving for an 8 litre Bentley; I have all the lenses I need for now.

  3. #53
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    In the days when I started to learn photography as a teenager in the early 1950s range finders weren't very common and coupled range finders even less and I learned how to judge distance by trying to estimate the distance to an object and then measuring it, as time passed I became more accurate with my guestimates until I could do it every time, and even today I still find it very useful particularly when shooting street I can set the distance by scale without putting the camera to my eye before I'm ready to take the shot.
    Ben

  4. #54
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    If that's true, (i haven't researched it), why do my post-WWII measuring tools agree with pre-WWII British measurements?
    I recall reading something about similar parts made in the UK and the US during WWII which were not identical due to a slight difference in the inch.

    If the pre WWII British standard was adopted by the US then that would explain why your tools match.

    From Wikipedia:
    Industrial Inch

    In 1930 the British Standards Institution adopted an inch of exactly 25.4 mm. The American Standards Association followed suit in 1933. By 1935 industry in 16 countries had adopted the "industrial inch" as it came to be known.
    Seems to be a pre-war standardisation but it is likely old equipment was still in use during wartime. I think the difference is only a few thousandths of an inch though.


    Steve.
    Last edited by Steve Smith; 08-04-2012 at 11:49 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  5. #55
    Leigh B's Avatar
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    OK. I just asked a friend in Denmark who owns a company that manufacturers measuring instruments. Before that he was
    QC manager for a large Danish company for over 20 years, so he has considerable experience with metric measurements.

    He said fractions down to 1/4, and occasionally 1/8, are commonly used in speech, but very seldom in writing.

    So I guess you and I are both right.

    - Leigh
    “Wise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something.” - Plato

  6. #56
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    I will agree with that. I will often say half or quarter of a millimetre but I wouldn't ever write it down like that.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  7. #57

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    I will agree with that. I will often say half or quarter of a millimetre but I wouldn't ever write it down like that.


    Steve.
    I use fractions coversationally, but on a drawing or specification it would be a decimal - unless the spec or drawing is for me only.

  8. #58
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    One thing which causes confusion between us in England and the US part of the company is the use of the term 'mil'. We say it as a shortened version of millimetre but our American colleagues use it as the term for 1/1000".


    steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  9. #59
    zsas's Avatar
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    Well, since definiton 1, is the US definition, it must be the correct version...he

    mil 1 (ml)
    n.
    1. A unit of length equal to one thousandth (10-3) of an inch (0.0254 millimeter), used, for example, to specify the diameter of wire or the thickness of materials sold in sheets.
    2. A milliliter; one cubic centimeter.
    3. A unit of angular measurement used in artillery and equal to 1/6400 of a complete revolution.

    per
    http://www.thefreedictionary.com/mil
    Andy

  10. #60

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    One thing which causes confusion between us in England and the US part of the company is the use of the term 'mil'. We say it as a shortened version of millimetre but our American colleagues use it as the term for 1/1000".


    steve.
    Every machinist I know says "thou" for 1/1,000.



 

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