Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,832   Posts: 1,582,381   Online: 856
      
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 30 of 30
  1. #21

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,266
    Whenever possible use an incident light meter.

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Midlands, UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    920
    Well here's the final images on Portra.

    http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-Jvm9SShJeL...ettdiptych.jpg

  3. #23
    CGW
    CGW is offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,797
    Quote Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post
    ... and others get upset if their skin comes out too dark (even when that is the true color). Some people (no matter what race they are) have a mental image of hteirselves that just isn't quite the same as reality.

    But one "issue" I have noticed with dark skin is that the contrast can be great due to skin oil or perspiration so attention to lighting is essential.
    I think what's often the cause of your last point is the size and distance of the light source. Large diffusion and careful distance consideration can really make a difference.

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,266
    The high-contrast effect of black skin seems caused by differences in collogen/oils and pigmentation versus caucasian skin. Much more difficult to control so broad lighting, as you say, as well as other more "cosmetic" approaches are often in order.

    Here's an interesting example of what I'm talking about (especially the second photo)... to help anyone who has not yet experienced this. Although this is wet-plate photography vs regular film... the effect is quite the same:

    http://www.largeformatphotography.in...l=1#post917720

  5. #25
    CGW
    CGW is offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,797
    Quote Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post
    The high-contrast effect of black skin seems caused by differences in collogen/oils and pigmentation versus caucasian skin. Much more difficult to control so broad lighting, as you say, as well as other more "cosmetic" approaches are often in order.

    Here's an interesting example of what I'm talking about (especially the second photo)... to help anyone who has not yet experienced this. Although this is wet-plate photography vs regular film... the effect is quite the same:

    http://www.largeformatphotography.in...l=1#post917720
    Some more examples here. The shots of Gabby Sidibe show how a huge light source can help with very dark complexions. Don't buy the oil argument, sorry. Hot spots are the result of faulty lighting.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/25/ma...pagewanted=all

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,266
    Quote Originally Posted by CGW View Post
    Don't buy the oil argument, sorry.
    Well, I can't speak for you... but tell that to my skin!

  7. #27
    benjiboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    U.K.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    7,172
    [QUOTE=batwister;1378582]Well here's the final images on Portra.

    http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-Jvm9SShJeL...ettdiptych.jpg[/QUOTE
    To me the skin tone is about a stop too light for an Afro Caribbean lady.
    Ben

  8. #28

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Midlands, UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    920
    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    To me the skin tone is about a stop too light for an Afro Caribbean lady.
    There are no excessive highlights on her face which is an important judgement - this being a conservatory with open light - so you're looking at just about her natural skin tone here, at least by Portra's reckoning. The digital versions I posted are a different story, but if you flick between them, the wall and radiator tonality on the right image is just about the same. Which is interesting to me. So this difference in skin tone then has to do with the film's rendering and, as you'd expect (this being APUG) I prefer the result on film to the digital 'interpretation'. But, as an experiment, if I was to show both versions to the subject it would be interesting to see which she thinks is more accurate. With that in mind I think we're touching on some difficult questions about subjective interpretation at this point. I will darken it further and see how I feel though.

    http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-B8hmMCDdBz...00/dorrett.jpg

    http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-Jvm9SShJeL...ettdiptych.jpg

    Alternative version, with slight curves tweak on right image - about as far as I'd go:
    http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-d5oVf_EbJj...ttdiptych2.jpg

    Out of interest, how would one deal with this in the colour darkroom? If it was a question of burning in her face, at what point do you accept the way the film renders tone?
    Last edited by batwister; 08-10-2012 at 04:15 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #29

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Aurora, IL
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,982
    She looks a bit too light in the scan but it's easy to print the neg darker.

  10. #30

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,266
    Quote Originally Posted by batwister View Post
    Out of interest, how would one deal with this in the colour darkroom? If it was a question of burning in her face, at what point do you accept the way the film renders tone?
    Make the best possible print you can. Represent reality as realistically as you can. Re-print lighter or darker if your print isn't liked by the customer.

    I'm finding it interesting that some people seem to know what color that lady should be, yet only the photographer (as far as I can tell) has actually seen her.

    I can tell you for a fact... there is no one color (colour), nor a "most likely" color for a person-of-color. They come in a wide variety of shades, tones, etc.... for a variety of historical, genetic, or genealogical reasons.

    She looks just like an Auntie of mine who is from Jamaica... similar color... so what... some do and others don't.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin