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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post
    No offense intended to "afrank", but: +1.

    Please remember, Mr Frank, that many people here are not electrical engineers so that kind of advise could cause some to end up with a pile of scrap rather than a working meter.
    I REALLY think he means to calibrate a meter that is not metering correctly even with the correct ISO and shutter/fstop settings.

    AND that is the only way to do it.

    I apologize if I misunderstood him. Just wanted to point him in the direction he would en up going if he tried to "calibrate" his "non-working" meter.

    If so, just ignore my nonsense. BTW, what other "calibration" is there? :P
    "The Medium is the Message"

  2. #12

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    I think you and me and Clive and Leigh are on the same page about what 'calibration" means. You have no reason to apologize... this is a discussion forum and the discussion is good!

    I think where we depart is the D-I-Y aspects. Turning potentiometers and varable resistors and what-not isn't a particularly good idea if you don't know the correect settings or how the measure the correct settings. This is generally true with all sorts of electronics. I applaud the D-I-Yers (of which I am one) but always remain aware that there are some who simply don't have the skills, knowledge, and tools. That may not be the case, I don't know... but what I do know is that blindly turning adjustments often does not result in successful conclusion.

    Please understand, i'm not being critical of you... just discussing the flip side. Thanks for your participation on this forum!

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by afrank View Post
    I REALLY think he means to calibrate a meter that is not metering correctly even with the correct ISO and shutter/fstop settings.

    AND that is the only way to do it.

    I apologize if I misunderstood him. Just wanted to point him in the direction he would en up going if he tried to "calibrate" his "non-working" meter.

    If so, just ignore my nonsense. BTW, what other "calibration" is there? :P
    I am sorry because I am not familiar with this prism finder but are these adjustments that you're talking about are easy to get at? and do you know the function of each? and you can really get to the photocell and measure its resistance? Most cameras to do this would require quite a bit of disassembly.

  4. #14

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    I think the OP want to check and see if the meter is accurate before using it. Film testing is checking of the combination of both shutter speed accuracy as well as meter accuracy and possibly even aperture accuracy. To test only the meter and with the flash meter IV. I would find evenly lit, same color surface and compare reading. I would want to fill the frame with the surface. Try to find several different brightness level.

  5. #15
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    It is pointless to compare any REFLECTED light meter with any INCIDENT light meter, if the reflected meters are not being pointed at 18% grey card (we will dismiss debates about the better suitability of 12% grey target, for this discussion).

    It is perfectly suitable to compare two meters, both reflected light meters, simply by pointing both of them at the same tonality surface, even one which is not 18% (or 12%) tonality...a featureless wall would be an example. After all, the point is merely to determine if the unknown meter matches the known meter. If you compare three reflected meters made by different manufacturers, you are likely to run into the fact that there is NO SINGLE ABSOLUTE STANDARD that all manufacturers follow for meter calibration...the ISO standard equation allows manufacturers to choose the actual value of a 'constant' in the equation! But they nevertheless should be within 0.3-0.5EV of one another

  6. #16

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    The flash meter IV can be used in reflected light mode with an acceptance angle of 40 degrees. This meter can measure both flash and continuous light in both incident and reflected mode. With attachment it can measure a 10 or 5 degree spot as well.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chan Tran View Post
    ...are these adjustments that you're talking about are easy to get at? and do you know the function of each? and you can really get to the photocell and measure its resistance? Most cameras to do this would require quite a bit of disassembly.
    Indeed disassembly is required, a service manual is often the best way to go, usable found in PDF format online the more popular the camera/meter is. I do know the function of each, it can be seen on the link provided as almost all old meters based on CDS/Photocells/Photo-resistors work the same way, the only thing that changes is the values of the components and maybe extra components for custom fancy readings.

    Like most pointed out, its best to check if the metering is wrong first . Even then it could be the battery, some unclean contacts that hinder the connection to the battery or even a dirty meter window that wont let light through. Prisms usually get dirty and will set readings off.

    If someone is doing film photography developing and printing learning a bit about this wont hurt either :P.
    "The Medium is the Message"

  8. #18
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    You're "poor"? And you have a Canon 5D Mk II?? Come on, you can't have both...

    Forget about "calibrating (TTL) meter". Your first priority is to load transparency film into the camera and shoot as the meter reads the scene: leave it all to the TTL meter to start with. At the moment, you are speculating and this will generate reams and reams of conjecture, claim and counter claim (a.k.a. the countless Kodak threads). This loading of error-sensitive film is the litmus test. Don't use neg film as the latitude is too great to pick up errors, while tranny film is sensitive to +/– 0.3 stop (or 0.5 stop for those cameras that operate to that amount). When you've got that film back, all will be revealed.

    Don't rely on a digital camera when comparing meter readings. Stick to using the Minolta Flashmeter. You have the right tools for the job, just need some basic fact finding and putting the film in will achieve that. If there are glaring errors, time to brush up on your multi-spot, incident and reflected meter skills.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    Forget about "calibrating (TTL) meter". Your first priority is to load transparency film into the camera and shoot as the meter reads the scene: leave it all to the TTL meter to start with. .


    ...but never forget the phenomenon of 'subject failure'...a metering target which fails to match the assumption of average brightness of 18% gray. Even TTL meters cannot remain immune to subject brightness induced metering error!

  10. #20
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wiltw View Post
    ...but never forget the phenomenon of 'subject failure'...a metering target which fails to match the assumption of average brightness of 18% gray. Even TTL meters cannot remain immune to subject brightness induced metering error!
    In which case you have a reliable stand-by tool: an incident meter.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






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