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  1. #11
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    There are already light value (LV) and exposure value (EV) numerical systems. Why not use those?

    Relating to Sunny 16 at ISO 100 (where EV = LV) we get 15 for bright sun, decreasing by one for each step in the sequence.


    Steve.
    The system used by David Lyga is in fact strictly using the EV indication that we find on light meters. For ISO 400, 1/125@f/16 the light meter indicates EV17. The same exposure values at ISO 100 would be rendered as EV15.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
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  2. #12
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    Too much analytical horsepower applied to too simple of a problem. Mounting a huge powerplant on a rowboat doesn't make it a speedboat. It just makes it an unwieldy rowboat—and one that was performing its intended function just fine using oars alone in the first place.

    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    —Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  3. #13
    Andy K's Avatar
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    Light meter and EV scale works for me. Nice and simple. Like me.


    -----------My Flickr-----------
    Anáil nathrach, ortha bháis is beatha, do chéal déanaimh.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    Aren't you over complicating this a little?
    (Psst, Clive, he's a CPA. )

    In seriousness though David, it is nice to be able to look at the scene and say "X" should be good.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  5. #15

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    I just use a light meter and if the battery fails then use sunny 16 rule.

    Jeff

  6. #16
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    I look at a scene as I approach it and think that looks like 1/125 at f8, so when I'm there I don't have to waste time with this sort of thing.
    Last edited by cliveh; 10-14-2012 at 04:15 PM. Click to view previous post history.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  7. #17

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    David! In your original post you presented 2 different things.
    1. The first is similar to what was called APEX system which I didn't know about until I started to use the same thing like you did. By assigning a number value to aperture and shutter speed it does make it's easier to calculate the shutter speed and aperture from a light value. This has nothing to do with a meter. You can use a calculating wheel similar to that of many older exposure meter. And yes I do like to assign numerical values to aperture and shutter speeds like the way you do. While at first it takes time to remember them but I found that I could learn them by heart quickly.
    2. The second part you assign a light value to a condition for example full sun EV15 etc.. This part replaces the meter but one can elect to use this or not. One can use a meter to get the EV reading off the meter. However, I am like Cliveh that when I look at the scene I tend to intutively thought of an exposure in term or shutter speed and aperture combination rather than an ev number. And thus may need to those back to EV number mentally if I need to.

  8. #18

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    dave -- your system is not all that much different from some of the old methods of calculating exposure used before guys invented light meters -- I've got some in my collection, small books that go at great detail into sun, subject, time of day, time of season, etc etc etc.

    It all boils down to being aware of your film, your equipment and your surroundings ... if your system does this for you, then good on you, ignore those who say you over-complicate things. I personally like light meters but consider them advisory only -- final subject assessment is done in that greatest of all micro-processors, the human brain.

  9. #19

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    Thanks for describing this, David. Although I've read a lot about EVs and LVs, and have played with the APEX system, it's nice to hear someone's actual experiences with guesstimating light values and exposures.

    --John

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    I look at a scene as I approach it and think that looks like 1/125 at f8, so when I'm there I don't have to waste time with this sort of thing.
    I try to preset for each situation too. It is very valuable. In fact I started a thread about it today http://www.apug.org/forums/forum48/1...nting-bit.html

    So i have a question, what ISO?

    It's an honest question, not flippant. It takes all three.

    Time and aperture are used to make creative choices, time controls blur, aperture controls DOF.

    ISO finishes the equation to get proper exposure.

    Im trying to figure out why.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

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