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  1. #21
    baachitraka's Avatar
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    Incident meter(Negative film) Bright Light: Close down 'one stop' if metering is based on 'shadow' and open up 'one stop' if metering is based on 'hightlight', provided that scene has both shadows and highlights.

    Diffused Light: Just incident meter the scene. If not, adjust after testing.

    Incident meter(Slide film): Just incident meter the scene since its range is 5 stops.
    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
    Rolleicord Va: Humble.
    Holga 120GFN: Amazingly simple yet it produces outstanding negatives to print.

  2. #22

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    Thanks for all of your imputs but I think I have my answer this morning. I didn't take any shots but did a bunch of readings cross referencing with my Canon 30D. Is reflective. I can't meter the incident light when the subject isn't even remotely near what I am standing. Needless to say, using the incident reading I would get overexposed shots. With metering with reflective lighting, I first meter off the sky since the reading should be constant. I then point my light meter to the scene in front of me. If I am getting no less than 1 stop difference, which means I am meaning off too much of the sky. Then, I point my light meter a bit towards the ground/water, I would get a bit more than 1 stop of exposure difference. That's the correct reading and I verified the reading with my DSLR and the historgram too.

  3. #23
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    The light meters in digital cameras are designed for that cameras individual sensor not film , so I.S.O 100 on a digital camera isn't the same as 100 I.S.O on a hand held separate light meter and film which is why the readings don't agree, if you want to use a reflected/incidental hand held meter use film.
    Ben

  4. #24
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TooManyShots View Post
    With the Gossen Luna Pro light meter, I can meter the scene with ambient light or reflective. Let say I want to take a light reading of some tree during the fall foliage and there is a body of water (lake) in between me and the trees. The sun is at my back, 8 o clock. Do I meter this scene with the incident mode? Or do I meter off the reflective light coming from the trees? Would the reflective mode be accurate even when I am no where near my subjects?
    First rule: incident light metering is executed by placing the light meter near the subject and pointing it toward the camera. That's VERY different from reflected light metering, which is performed by pointing the light meter toward the subject.

    Second rule: if you cannot walk to the subject, because there is an obstacle in between or simply because the subject is far, you try to make a measure in the same light conditions of your subject.

    In your case, provided you are in the same light conditions as the trees, you only need to turn yourself, and point your incident light meter toward the light falling on the subject, with the same angle it would have if pointed from the subject toward your camera. In your situation, you would point the incident light meter while leaving the sun at 2 o'clock.

    This reading will be very reliable unless the light falling on the subject is different from the light falling on your light meter.

    As an example, imagine the pond you mention reflects some light on the trees, but does not reflect any light on your light meter because you are on "this" side of the pond in relation to the sun.

    This is where you begin applying reasoning. If the pond reflects some light on the trees, you can do two things:

    - Close half stop or an entire stop if REALLY you can can evaluate the effect by eyesight and it is "dramatic";
    - Just use your incident light reading "as is" because you are using a negative film which will easily digest any degree of overexposure.
    - If some details in the shadows are important, or better said if the shadows of your scene are overall "weighting" for extension and importance, then you can even open 1 stop in relation of the incident light metering. That will let your film "dig into" the shadows opening them very well while, again, the colour negative material will stretch to the highlights retaining details without effort.

    Fabrizio
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  5. #25
    baachitraka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TooManyShots View Post
    Needless to say, using the incident reading I would get overexposed shots.
    Not only you get the shots overexposed(metering shadows only), but also possible to get them underexposed(metering highlights only).

    The simplest solution for B+W negative is to meter at shadows and close down a stop.

    Example, incident shadow reading say EV 8 then shoot at EV 9.

    I presonally have no trouble with roll films. If you are shooting sheets you may need slightly more sophisticated technique which is very well explained in BTZS book.
    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
    Rolleicord Va: Humble.
    Holga 120GFN: Amazingly simple yet it produces outstanding negatives to print.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    The light meters in digital cameras are designed for that cameras individual sensor not film , so I.S.O 100 on a digital camera isn't the same as 100 I.S.O on a hand held separate light meter and film which is why the readings don't agree, if you want to use a reflected/incidental hand held meter use film.
    That maybe true but the thing is that I was using the light meter on my 30D to shoot my first roll. I didn't have a light meter with me that time. The shots turned out OK. "http://www.flickr.com/photos/vracing/sets/72157631785544025/" Removed the quotes. Yeah, another way to meter is to turn the meter facing the sun and take an incident reading. This obviously would require me to walk maybe 200 ft to get into an open area. This may or may not be possible in real life of course.

  7. #27
    wiltw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    The light meters in digital cameras are designed for that cameras individual sensor not film , so I.S.O 100 on a digital camera isn't the same as 100 I.S.O on a hand held separate light meter and film which is why the readings don't agree, if you want to use a reflected/incidental hand held meter use film.
    OMG, this is a lot of misleading information. If it were true, why would my Minolta Spotmeter F give me identical readings as my Canon dSLR, when both are aimed at the same 18% grey card and set to the same ISO value?!?!?!

    In fact, using my Minolta Autometer Vf in incident mode, its reading agrees with the two reflected light meters mentioned above, too.

    And exposures are fully satisfactory if I am shooting with my medium format film color transparencies or my dSLR...I do not need to compensate one vs. the other, to deviate from the meter suggestion, which would be necessary if the digital ISO value were not the same as film ISO.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by wiltw View Post
    OMG, this is a lot of misleading information. If it were true, why would my Minolta Spotmeter F give me identical readings as my Canon dSLR, when both are aimed at the same 18% grey card and set to the same ISO value?!?!?!

    In fact, using my Minolta Autometer Vf in incident mode, its reading agrees with the two reflected light meters mentioned above, too.

    Hahahaha....that's almost like saying each DSLR unit has its own metering standard and photographers can't cross reference with one body with another. I am pretty sure if you meter with an EOS 3 with a Canon 1dmarkIII on the same scene, you get the exact same reading.

  9. #29
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    What is different about metering for negatives and metering for digital is that digital ISO is determined by a resulting JPEG that comes from the standard ISO process for digital, essentially the "final result", much as for slide film.

    The resultant JPEG is a result or the sensor and the manufacturers software, hence different for every camera. A DSLR can get you a reasonable exposure setting at a given ISO but it is far from being able to mimic a negative.

    ISO for negative film is keyed to the negative's density at certain points. Negatives are an intermediate medium, while there is an ISO speed point film can, for example with XP2 a 400 speed film, be shot at 50,100,200,400, or 800 and create nearly equivalent prints, the "final result".
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  10. #30
    baachitraka's Avatar
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    Your samples in flickr has survied from metering through digital camera because SBR is rather very short or short. In almost all examples, except the pot rest have shot with diffused light.
    Last edited by baachitraka; 10-18-2012 at 03:21 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
    Rolleicord Va: Humble.
    Holga 120GFN: Amazingly simple yet it produces outstanding negatives to print.

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