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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by perkeleellinen View Post
    What stumped the sales guy was when I asked how the camera knew if I had Kodak or Konica film loaded.
    Oh he didn't know that the camera has sensor that could take a digital photograph of the film cassette and use OCR to know which brand of film, film type and how many exposures. I bet you didn't know that either right? Digital imaging technology was invented way before there were films.

  2. #22
    mindthemix's Avatar
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    Thank you guys for all your input and knowledge! I'm still waiting feedback from the lab.

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by FritsM View Post
    Dale Labs? I remember that outfit from ages (well, 25 years) ago.

    They used to sell generic color negative film by mail order that could only be processed and printed by them, and they would supply you with a set of "slides" too. The film in question was color negative stock used in the movie industry, respooled into 35mm film canisters. Hence the slides (color positive prints). Can you hear the film director say: "print it!"

    I forgot what the exact film type number was, 6036 or so.

    CODE "C41DEV36" That tells you all: C41! 36 exposures. Their grand mistake.
    Still, I think they caught it after the fact and pushed some print film on you, while they were trying to wash their hands clean...

    Get a film processing tank, some developer and fixer and do it yourself instead. You'll be amazed how easy it is and with care far superior to anything you've seen before, aside from it being totally customizable to your process and needs.
    I remember Dale, too. I even tried their crap once. Judging by the results I remember getting (lousy color, grain) they should be very popular with the hipster crowd.

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    I remember Dale, too. I even tried their crap once. Judging by the results I remember getting (lousy color, grain) they should be very popular with the hipster crowd.
    I was teaching a photography class at the time and someone ordered some film and tested it out. Results were like you said and not encouraging for further "experiments." The slides looked like a nice bonus until you projected them...

  5. #25
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    Do like some others have said, get a tank and some D-76 or XTOL, stop and fixer and process your own B&W. It's very easy to do and fun! You can be up and running for not a lot of money. No fingerprints and no scratches unless YOU do it so once you get it figured out you will have excellent quality. If you cannot do the whole enlarger/darkroom thing, scan your negatives and send them out for printing, or inkjet print them yourself. And remember, a darkroom can just be a DARK ROOM, so you don't need anything special, although you might want to go that way before long.

    They gave you color film. Any Acros I've used (120 format) has a clear base. What happens with b/w film in color developer is that after the color development step the film is bleached, turning all the reduced silver back into a silver halide. The fixing step then removes all the halide and would leave a clear, blank film. In a color film the reaction between the exposed silver halide and the developer would form insoluble color dyes representing the image. The bleach step and then fixing removes all the silver but leaves the dye image. A b/w film has no dye couplers, so no dye image can be formed. The color developer would still form a negative image but as I mentioned above, the bleaching and fixing step would "erase' it. Color film contains (ideally) no silver once it has been fully processed.

    An unexposed color film will be blank because there are no exposed halides and therefore no dyes will form. However, there would still be edge markings. A truly blank color film has just been fixed out.

    They will try and tell you this was something you did wrong but it's not. It's their doing.

    -- Jason
    All this has happened before, and all this will happen again.

  6. #26
    mindthemix's Avatar
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    Thanks a lot Jason for the detailed feedback and kudos on the developing!

  7. #27
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    Finally the answer from the lab. As many of you have said, they sent me a color negative by mistake. Good news is they found my roll and I'll get it soon.

    Again, thanks for all your advice with my post.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by FritsM View Post
    I was teaching a photography class at the time and someone ordered some film and tested it out. Results were like you said and not encouraging for further "experiments." The slides looked like a nice bonus until you projected them...

    I never got that far!

  9. #29
    mindthemix's Avatar
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    I just ordered my first piece of DR equipment; a Jobo Tank #1520 and keep shopping...

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