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  1. #1
    mindthemix's Avatar
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    Acros 100 roll came completely blank - Possible C-41 development?

    I already asked the lab if they developed in C-41 by mistake.

    The entire roll came completely blank.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    There's no issue with the camera and all the previous rolls (this is my first Acros) came without any problems.

    Are these images sign that the lab did something wrong?

    Thanks for all your help!

  2. #2

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    Something like that, all the silver has been bleach-fixed away. There are no edge markings either, so it's not blank from non-exposure.
    But why is the base so orange? Is that normal for Acros? I've never used it.

    That control number on the end should tell the lab which processor was used, and when. I think they should fess up.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by FritsM View Post
    Something like that, all the silver has been bleach-fixed away. There are no edge markings either, so it's not blank from non-exposure.
    But why is the base so orange? Is that normal for Acros? I've never used it.

    That control number on the end should tell the lab which processor was used, and when. I think they should fess up.
    Thanks for the prompt reply!
    I'm new to film and this is my first Acros, the whole rolls is that color. I'll post the answer from the lab.

  4. #4

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    what frits said -- no edge numbers mean it was improperly developed -- who did you take it to? Acros is B/W film and needs to be processed in b/w chemicals, NOT color film chemicals -- my guess: Some kid who doesn't know there's a difference ran it through the c-41 machine, which may explain the orange color, or may not. I mean, b.w film comes out clear or slightly gray/purple, not orange.

    almost wonder if they slipped you a blank/bad roll of old color film back.

    There IS b/w film that is processed in c-41 -- kodak makes some, and ilford's xp2, and some labs even wonder "how do I process this" and I have to carefully point to the "process c-41" on the roll. The reverse mistake is also very possible.

    Find a good custom lab that knows, or send your film to Blue Moon in Seattle, or even bester, learn to do your own. It is insanely easy.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by summicron1 View Post
    ...almost wonder if they slipped you a blank/bad roll of old color film back....
    I wouldn't be surprised if they did. The lab is likely trying to cover up their mistake. And for most unknowing customers that may work just fine. But they don't know you have a forum of enthusiasts and experts behind you.

    I doubt Acros has an orange base, even when processed in whatever. C41 or E6 cannot tint the base or emulsion like that. A heavy orange base would make it challenging to print correctly using a conventional B&W process, including Multigrade paper.

    As summicron1 said, it looks like a roll of generic Color Negative stock (print film) was handed back to you. A gray/purplish gray is more to be expected for a B&W film base.


    Quote Originally Posted by summicron1 View Post
    ...or even bester, learn to do your own. It is insanely easy.
    Absolutely! And it's fun too.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by summicron1 View Post
    what frits said -- no edge numbers mean it was improperly developed -- who did you take it to? Acros is B/W film and needs to be processed in b/w chemicals, NOT color film chemicals -- my guess: Some kid who doesn't know there's a difference ran it through the c-41 machine, which may explain the orange color, or may not. I mean, b.w film comes out clear or slightly gray/purple, not orange.

    almost wonder if they slipped you a blank/bad roll of old color film back.

    There IS b/w film that is processed in c-41 -- kodak makes some, and ilford's xp2, and some labs even wonder "how do I process this" and I have to carefully point to the "process c-41" on the roll. The reverse mistake is also very possible.

    Find a good custom lab that knows, or send your film to Blue Moon in Seattle, or even bester, learn to do your own. It is insanely easy.
    Thanks for the knowledge!

    The lab is Dale Laboratories in Hollywood, Florida.

    I drooped two rolls that day; one Acros and the other a generic B&W film that came with one Electro 35 I bought. Based on their invoice the first order for the Acros Shows the CODE "BWDEV36" and for the second roll the CODE "C41DEV36". Funny thing is I called them two weeks ago to check if they can develop Acros and their response was a serious yes.

  7. #7

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    Dale Labs? I remember that outfit from ages (well, 25 years) ago.

    They used to sell generic color negative film by mail order that could only be processed and printed by them, and they would supply you with a set of "slides" too. The film in question was color negative stock used in the movie industry, respooled into 35mm film canisters. Hence the slides (color positive prints). Can you hear the film director say: "print it!"

    I forgot what the exact film type number was, 6036 or so.

    CODE "C41DEV36" That tells you all: C41! 36 exposures. Their grand mistake.
    Still, I think they caught it after the fact and pushed some print film on you, while they were trying to wash their hands clean...

    Get a film processing tank, some developer and fixer and do it yourself instead. You'll be amazed how easy it is and with care far superior to anything you've seen before, aside from it being totally customizable to your process and needs.

  8. #8

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    I've seen B&W film that has gone through C-41 and it comes out as clear film, with all the emulsion having been stripped off. As others have suggested it is most likely that they threw your clear B&W film away and gave you some old colour neg film to make you think it was a camera problem. I have heard of labs doing this.

  9. #9
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by FritsM View Post
    As summicron1 said, it looks like a roll of generic Color Negative stock (print film) was handed back to you.
    Quote Originally Posted by FritsM View Post
    Still, I think they caught it after the fact and pushed some print film on you, while they were trying to wash their hands clean...
    Cine-print film has no mask. It will not show the orange cast typical to most C-41 negative films.

    I assume it is either
    -) un-signed (why?), un-exposed still-photography (KS-perforations) C-41 film

    -) masked cine-intermediary film

  10. #10

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    Years ago I gave a few rolls of B&W to my local photo shop to develop, they had to send it out but when it returned it was completely blank (not orange). It had been put through the C41 process but what was weird was that the sales guy at the shop tried to blame me by saying this was a unexposed roll of film I'd handed in. I argued that it couldn't be as there was no edge markings, hence the lab was to blame. He told me that cameras put the edge markings on the film, hence no markings, no exposures! Took a lot of explaining for him to relent and a lot of time for the lab to properly compensate me (they tried to fob me off with one free roll of generic colour film).
    Steve.

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