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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by kintatsu View Post
    Actually, I use both the Gossen Sixtomat and the Sixtino, but they aren't spot meters. They both work incredibly well, so it's not an issue with no meter. Between the spot meter on my 7D and my 2 handheld meters, I'm ok, just curious about this and anyone's experience. Mightn't this be handy, with some modification and calculations, as a learning tool, perhaps? Even as a bit of an experiment in exposure calculation and lighting awareness, something can be gained.

    Based on your comment about having used an extinction meter, I take it they're slightly more than useless in most situations.

    I didn't mean to come across as someone who's just looking for the cheap way out, or something. I love learning something every chance I get, and learning the way things used to be done, helps bring home an awareness of the work that the old masters actually did. I even try to cook the old ways my folks made things, and teach my daughter some of it. Using old techniques and tools keeps our past richly alive for those who come after us to share in it.
    BTW- $50 is about 40 sheets of film, so yeah the potential for throwing money into a bonfire could be quite high!
    I had a "Heyde's Aktino-photo-meter" and it was slightly better than nothing; actually it was sort of OK outside during the day once you figured out the film sensitivity scale.

    I didn't mean to offend with my comment about getting a meter, and I'm glad that you are approaching the craft(s) as you do - understanding what went before gives a more profound understanding of what we have now.

    E. (practitioner of obsolete technology) von Hoegh.
    Last edited by E. von Hoegh; 01-10-2013 at 09:18 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: spellynge

  2. #12
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    I didn't take any offense, just trying to clarify interest and intent.

    I appreciate your comments and feedback. It's things like this that make joining this forum so enjoyable and valuable. I would like to find an old spotmeter that shows c/ft2, or even a more recent one showing lux. Having those values provides a nice reference when discussing our photos or planning our next shoot.

    Like I said previously, keeping the old ways alive is something I like. There seems to be a greater reward, not because they're difficult, but because you become involved. I've never tasted anything as good as my parents' homemade strawberry jam or pickles, and don't think I ever will, unless I make it with my daughter.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by kintatsu View Post
    I didn't take any offense, just trying to clarify interest and intent.

    I appreciate your comments and feedback. It's things like this that make joining this forum so enjoyable and valuable. I would like to find an old spotmeter that shows c/ft2, or even a more recent one showing lux. Having those values provides a nice reference when discussing our photos or planning our next shoot.

    Like I said previously, keeping the old ways alive is something I like. There seems to be a greater reward, not because they're difficult, but because you become involved. I've never tasted anything as good as my parents' homemade strawberry jam or pickles, and don't think I ever will, unless I make it with my daughter.
    You can make a chart for any meter/spotmeter, calculating from LV or even EV @ ISO 100 to lux and/or foot-candles.

  4. #14
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    Sorry for the delay in replying.

    You can make a chart for any meter/spotmeter, calculating from LV or even EV @ ISO 100 to lux and/or foot-candles.
    I'm working on making up a quick reference for my 7D's meter now. The knowledge is there, I've just got to get it on paper! It comes in handy in determining the exposure and values for reference and for discussion, and allows us to better understand the work of those who came before us. Arbitrary EVs and the like often leave out bits that could help us share our experience, as those values and references change over time.

    wait...this is based on someone's subjective opinion of "details", right? is that right? it's based on someone's eyeball perception? with no previous calibration to the particular person. Just so this is nice and sparkling clear--is this how it works?--the perception of the individual? Or is there some detail here that's not being seen?
    As far as this method being subjective, isn't all our work? When we take readings and expose for our goal, aren't we subjecting the image our interpretation? Not to mention focusing based on our eyesight. I would think that using this method, you could replicate the detail at your desired level.

    I'm still curious to hear if anyone has used this method. Based on the comments, it doesn't seem viable or repeatable for real photos.

  5. #15
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    You can make a chart for any meter/spotmeter, calculating from LV or even EV @ ISO 100 to lux and/or foot-candles.
    EV 10 @100 gives about 125 c/m2, which gives about 12 c/ft2. EV 11 would therefore be about 24 and so on.

    I've decided to get the Gossen Starlite 2, so things should be cool as far as that goes. C/m2 to C/ft2 is a simple conversion, so it shouldn't be an issue. I'll also have a way to verify this concept with a real spot meter and may get some kind of chart worked out for how the camera can be used as far as compensating for the human factor to some very small degree.

    The single biggest human factor, is that every time you photograph, the light may be the same, but the other variables will lead to improper perception, and ultimately a wide range of possible errors.

  6. #16
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    I hate to reveal my ignorance, but can someone explain the term "extinction meter" for me?


    web site: Dan Henderson, Photographer.com

    blog: https://danhendersonphotographer.wordpress.com/

    I am not anti-digital. I am pro-film.

  7. #17
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    An extinction meter basically uses different density steps to determine the lowest level of light available. A chart is then consulted to determine exposure. They generally use letters or numbers in a progressively denser series of steps. They were a step up from the old actinic meters, using paper exposed to light.

    2 issues related to these meters relate to the ability of the eye to adapt to low light. One is the initial reading has to be made with the eye adapted to lower light, and the other is the eye becomes adapted to the point of compensating for lower light.

    I've never used one, so can't attest to how well they work, or how off they are when the eye is outside the "adapted range" of usability. Reading the old Kodak manual aroused my curiosity, and left me wondering.

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