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  1. #1

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    Question about adjusting and averaging exposure, pretty basic stuff

    Hey guys, got a quick question. For those of you using a spot meter for landscapes, could you average 2 readings (one for the highlight and one for shadows) to get a correct exposure for the entire scene? For instance, say you spot meter a shaded area and get 1/20 at f16, and then measure a bright area and get 1/125 at f16, could you then assume that 1/50th f16 would be about the correct exposure? Are there better ways to do this, does anyone have any tips? I have always used cameras with TTL metering and just bought my first meterless camera, I guess this is what happens when your so used to being able to just spin dials until the camera tells you your good.
    Last edited by BenJT; 01-09-2013 at 04:06 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #2
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Are you using negative film, or transparency film?

    If negative film, and you are shooting black and white, you set your exposure based on a shadow area with important detail, then measure the highlight with important detail, and determine from the difference between the two what development to use.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  3. #3
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    I suggest that you get yourself a copy of The Negative, even if you don't have a view camera and don't intend to get one, you'll learn much. Even a copy of this has excellant discussions on exposure.

  4. #4
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Are you using negative film, or transparency film?

    If negative film, and you are shooting black and white, you set your exposure based on a shadow area with important detail, then measure the highlight with important detail, and determine from the difference between the two what development to use.
    What he said.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  5. #5
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    What he said.
    What he said he said...

    Except I'll add that I read the deepest shadow I want detail and generally take two stops off of that as my exposure.
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  6. #6

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    Thanks guys, I'm shooting black and white and color negative film, a good book on exposure is something I'm definitely going to buy.

    Matt, what you explain is what I was trying to describe.

  7. #7
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    Your OP seems to be centered around "averaging" the high and low spot readings----that is different from "placing" the desired shadow on the gray scale and then reading where the desired high value "falls" on the gray scale to determine the development, although it is a closer step toward accounting for the subject brightness range of the scene.



 

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