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  1. #1

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    How to get your partner out on a shoot

    I'm off tomorrow to try and take advantage of the snow on the North York Moors and get some landscapes with my new Bronica. As far as my partner's concerned, we're going to give our young dog a good run and it'll be nice to get out in the fresh air, but of course the only thing on my mind is taking photos! Does anyone else have any good excuses to go on trips?

  2. #2
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mudfly9 View Post
    I'm off tomorrow to try and take advantage of the snow on the North York Moors and get some landscapes with my new Bronica. As far as my partner's concerned, we're going to give our young dog a good run and it'll be nice to get out in the fresh air, but of course the only thing on my mind is taking photos! Does anyone else have any good excuses to go on trips?
    No, but my image Rue Rambuteau that I put on the gallery some months ago, I nearly named – “couldn’t wait for something interesting to happen, as wife was getting bored.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  3. #3
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    Clive - too funny.

    My husband likes to go to car shows so I end up taking a fair number of pictures of cars every summer. Not really my favorite subject, but it's something I can do while rambles on about whether it's the right year piece on something.

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    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    One thing I have difficult with is getting people to understand that a photography outing is a lot like going hunting or fishing. You don't just go out, throw your line into the water and catch a fish. Neither do you just go out and snap a picture.

    There is a lot of waiting for the right moment and there is an element of luck involved. Some days you bite the bear. Some days the bear bites you, so to speak.

    An outing, no matter what the reason, is a social occasion which gives one the opportunity to participate in some "sporting" activity, whether that "sport" be fishing, photography or what-have-you.

    I recently went on vacation and, on the drive home, we stopped at New River Gorge in West Virginia. Of course, I wanted to take pictures but my wife seemed to have the idea that I would just get out of the car and take pictures. She didn't seem to understand that there is a lot of walking around, looking, talking and just plain enjoying the scenery.

    I wonder whether the OP's partner has the same attitude.

    I suppose that we, as photographers, could participate in the things that our partners want to do but I often feel that unspoken pressure that says, "Okay, go take pictures, now." :|
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

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    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  5. #5
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Worker 11811 View Post
    One thing I have difficult with is getting people to understand that a photography outing is a lot like going hunting or fishing. You don't just go out, throw your line into the water and catch a fish. Neither do you just go out and snap a picture.

    There is a lot of waiting for the right moment and there is an element of luck involved. Some days you bite the bear. Some days the bear bites you, so to speak.

    An outing, no matter what the reason, is a social occasion which gives one the opportunity to participate in some "sporting" activity, whether that "sport" be fishing, photography or what-have-you.

    I recently went on vacation and, on the drive home, we stopped at New River Gorge in West Virginia. Of course, I wanted to take pictures but my wife seemed to have the idea that I would just get out of the car and take pictures. She didn't seem to understand that there is a lot of walking around, looking, talking and just plain enjoying the scenery.

    I wonder whether the OP's partner has the same attitude.

    I suppose that we, as photographers, could participate in the things that our partners want to do but I often feel that unspoken pressure that says, "Okay, go take pictures, now." :|
    Exactly - how many hours did HCB wait for this shot -

    http://www.google.co.uk/imgres?q=HCB...r:54,s:0,i:246

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

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    Well firstly I'd like to point out that if my partner wants to do something like go clothes shopping, I'm extremely supportive and encouraging, so it's not a one way street!

    My partner is verbally supportive, but her body language belies this. That and little things like getting very cross with holding the dog and telling me how she won't keep still. I did once manage to get her to burn through a roll of film on a Trip35 on an outing and will be trying the same tactic tomorrow, presumably if I can get her hooked then there'll be no problems. Apart from perhaps who has to hold the dog!

    I like the fishing analogy, so I do sometimes go out on my own so I can sit and wait for the right shot. It would, however, be nice to share this with someone, but at least I should be thankful I don't have a partner who's negative. No pun intended.

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    How to get your partner out on a shoot

    I have found that it's best not to go on trips contemplating great photography with someone who is not interested or involved. It is seldom satisfactory for either party. You need to be able to concentrate on finding good viewpoints and compositions without worrying about whether or not your partner/friend is dying of boredom. Walks, or other outings with non-photographers can be a good opportunity to check out the photographic potential of a location. Most times you can plan a return visit purely for photography.

  8. #8
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mudfly9 View Post
    My partner is verbally supportive, but her body language belies this.
    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Muir View Post
    I have found that it's best not to go on trips contemplating great photography with someone who is not interested or involved. It is seldom satisfactory for either party.
    I believe the problem is dealing with people who can't see creatively. (Think visually.)

    My wife is an excellent baker. She can become involved in kitchen just as deeply as I can become involved in the darkroom. In fact, sometimes, while she's baking, I'll be in the darkroom. So, this proves that it isn't about understanding one another's hobby or passion. We're perfectly happy to give each other "space." However, she can ask me whether some recipe needs more cinnamon, for instance, and I can give her a coherent answer. But, if I ask her if a photo needs more contrast, I often get the feeling that she just can't see the difference.

    I really think that most people believe that a photographer simply points the lens at something and presses the button while the camera does all the work.

    I honestly believe that most people, even some who think they are photographers, don't have the ability to think visually, analyze what they see and take steps to make an image from what they see in front of them.

    I think that is the source of the friction that occurs between photographers and non-photographers.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  9. #9
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    My wife refers to it as "futzing".

    Don't get me wrong, she is amazingly supportive, and really likes the result, it is just the process that she wonders about some times.

    My suggestion: get the dog interested in it. At least you will have non-judgmental company.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  10. #10

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    Going out on walks with others means no more than taking quick snaps for me. If you go expecting that, anything else is an unexpected joy.
    Steve.

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