Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,300   Posts: 1,535,828   Online: 820
      
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 38
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,035
    Quote Originally Posted by fotch View Post
    A meter is like any measuring device. Rulers, levels, micrometers, thermometers, scales, etc. Use depends on outcome. If the outcome is important and time permits using a measuring device, I would use. JMHO
    I'm not much of a gambler myself. Although I use a meter all of the time, I use it intelligently and find that measuring each shot isn't always necessary if one is attentive to the lighting conditions.

  2. #12
    mr rusty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    lancashire, UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    612
    Images
    97
    When using a metered camera, I often have a guess to myself what the exposure is going to be before I actually look. Most of the time I am pretty close - within the exposure latitude of the film. Anyway, even using a meter requires thought. Snow. White building. etc. You still have to assess and open it up a stop or two. Here in the UK I tend to use sunny 11ish

  3. #13
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,279
    Images
    60
    A meter contributes useful information - as a suggestion.

    I like to let my eyes/brain/experience use that information to determine the exposure.

    That being said, my eyes/brain/experience frequently agree with the meter's suggestion.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,591
    There is really no such thing as exposure latitude, just a factor of how far thing can be off and still be
    nominally usable at the expense of what the film was really engineered for in the ideal sense, which of
    course is related to the amount of contrast in a scene. Amateur color neg films are marketed under the assumption that folks will be winging it with less than ideal training or equipment, and will want Aunt Maude's skintones still looking vaguely human even if everything else in the print looks like hell. I use a spotmeter for everything, though have worked sheerly from memory in a few instances even with trickier chrome films. But otherwise, it's about like asking a sniper to walk around with a blindfolded.
    In the old days, they'd print a little tip sheet on the film box, which usually worked for garden-variety
    applications. My mother tooks photogrphs her whole life using a little box Brownie with no meter -
    and every single shot was horrible!

  5. #15
    cliveh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,224
    Images
    343
    I have a prism meter in my Hasselblad, which I find useful when using colour, or doing critical macro work. However, when using the M2, with the same film and developer year on year, I can usually guess within ½ a stop.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Philadelphia area
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    302
    Images
    10
    I always use a meter as if it is easy to misuse a meter, it is much easier to get the eye fouled by light condition. It does not mean I meter before each shot but I do it at least once to get a correct basis for exposure. Of course, with sunny16, no need for a meter...
    "The problem with photography is that it only deals with appearances." Duane Michals

    "A photograph is a secret of a secret. The more it tells you the less you know." Diane Arbus

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Harrisburg, PA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    13
    My line of thinking is to commit a couple common situations to memory (Sunny, overcast, dusk, bright indoor/streetlights, dim indoor) at one ISO (probably 400) and use my noggin to figure things out from there. There are only a few EV steps in between those situations, so it shouldn't be hard to judge one way or the other.

  8. #18
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Ignacio, CO, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,682
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    There is really no such thing as exposure latitude, ...
    For you this may be perfectly true, that doesn't mean it's true for me or anybody else though.

    Did a little test a while back, shot Delta 400 from -1 to +2 stops, developed in DD-X and was able to print the exact same, really nice print across the whole range of negatives by changing nothing but enlarger exposure.

    Took a vacation a while back, used a dozen disposable cameras and got a lot of great stuff across a wide range of situations. Do the same with my Holga regularly too.

    The book "Theory of the Photographic Process, forth edition, T.H.James" page 506 in chapter 17 by J.H.Altman has a graph that show about a 3-stop range (1-log relative exposure) across which the panel of 200 observers judged as producing excellent prints. Same book chapter 19 by C.N.Nelson page 556 a graph comparing differences in print quality from short toe and long toe films on a studio portrait. The graph shows a range of 4-5 stops across which a negative can be shot which can produce excellent prints, 90th percentile quality or better. Short toe films approach the 100th percentile for a very short maybe one stop area, and maybe that's where you are trying to hang out which is great, but switch to long toe films in the same situation and they approach the 100th percentile over about a 3-stop range.

    Exposure latitude exists.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  9. #19
    fotch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    SE WI- USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,095
    Quote Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post
    I'm not much of a gambler myself. Although I use a meter all of the time, I use it intelligently and find that measuring each shot isn't always necessary if one is attentive to the lighting conditions.
    I agree.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Adirondacks
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,378
    I would no more go out with a camera and not bring a meter than I would make parts on a lathe without a micrometer.

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin